2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161051
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inviting Family Presence During Resuscitation: Nurses' Decisions and Perceptions
Abstract:
Inviting Family Presence During Resuscitation: Nurses' Decisions and Perceptions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Twibell, Renee, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University
Contact Address:Nursing, School of Nursing, Muncie, IN, 47304, USA
Co-Authors:D. Siela, D. Johnson, and J. Wheatley, Nursing, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; D. Bousman, S. Cable, P. Caudill-Cochran, S. Harrigan, R. Hollars, A. Neal, R. Tina, and C. Riwitis, Nursing Service, Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, IN
With increasing frequency, families request to be present during end-of-life care. Controversy exists about the risks and benefits of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR). Frequently, nurses' perceptions and decisions determine whether or not families are present. Little is known about the factors that influence nurses' decisions to invite FPDR. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine correlates of nurses' decisions to support FPDR. Specifically, this study examined the relationships among nurses' perceptions of risk, benefit, self-confidence, and the frequency with which nurses invited FPDR. Bandura's (1978) theory of self-efficacy and Hammond's (1988) Cognitive Continuum theory of decision-making guided the study. Nurses (n=375) from a variety of inpatient units completed the Family Presence Self-Confidence Scale and the Family Presence Risk-Benefit Scale. Results indicated that the new scales were valid and reliable. Two hypotheses were supported. Nurses who had invited family presence more than five times reported more self-confidence, greater perceived benefit, and less perceived risk than nurses who had never invited FPDR (p < .001). Nurses who perceived greater confidence in managing FPDR also perceived less risk and more benefit (p < .001). Nurses who had been present at the resuscitation of their own family members perceived more benefit, less risk, and more self-confidence (p < .001). Nurses who wanted family members present at their own resuscitation perceived more benefit, less risk, and more self-confidence (p < .001). Self-confidence, risk, and benefit did not vary with age or experience but were related to education and whether or not nurses worked in critical care or non-critical care units (p < .05). Findings suggest that nurses' experiences with inviting FPDR are strongly associated with perceived risk and benefit of FPDR, with confidence in managing FPDR, and with personal preferences and experiences with FPDR. Nurses can assess their perceptions using these scales. Nurse leaders can design and test approaches for building nurses' confidence in FPDR and can encourage nurses to reflect on perceptions that influence decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInviting Family Presence During Resuscitation: Nurses' Decisions and Perceptionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161051-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Inviting Family Presence During Resuscitation: Nurses' Decisions and Perceptions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, Renee, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, School of Nursing, Muncie, IN, 47304, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rtwibell@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Siela, D. Johnson, and J. Wheatley, Nursing, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; D. Bousman, S. Cable, P. Caudill-Cochran, S. Harrigan, R. Hollars, A. Neal, R. Tina, and C. Riwitis, Nursing Service, Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With increasing frequency, families request to be present during end-of-life care. Controversy exists about the risks and benefits of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR). Frequently, nurses' perceptions and decisions determine whether or not families are present. Little is known about the factors that influence nurses' decisions to invite FPDR. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine correlates of nurses' decisions to support FPDR. Specifically, this study examined the relationships among nurses' perceptions of risk, benefit, self-confidence, and the frequency with which nurses invited FPDR. Bandura's (1978) theory of self-efficacy and Hammond's (1988) Cognitive Continuum theory of decision-making guided the study. Nurses (n=375) from a variety of inpatient units completed the Family Presence Self-Confidence Scale and the Family Presence Risk-Benefit Scale. Results indicated that the new scales were valid and reliable. Two hypotheses were supported. Nurses who had invited family presence more than five times reported more self-confidence, greater perceived benefit, and less perceived risk than nurses who had never invited FPDR (p &lt; .001). Nurses who perceived greater confidence in managing FPDR also perceived less risk and more benefit (p &lt; .001). Nurses who had been present at the resuscitation of their own family members perceived more benefit, less risk, and more self-confidence (p &lt; .001). Nurses who wanted family members present at their own resuscitation perceived more benefit, less risk, and more self-confidence (p &lt; .001). Self-confidence, risk, and benefit did not vary with age or experience but were related to education and whether or not nurses worked in critical care or non-critical care units (p &lt; .05). Findings suggest that nurses' experiences with inviting FPDR are strongly associated with perceived risk and benefit of FPDR, with confidence in managing FPDR, and with personal preferences and experiences with FPDR. Nurses can assess their perceptions using these scales. Nurse leaders can design and test approaches for building nurses' confidence in FPDR and can encourage nurses to reflect on perceptions that influence decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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