2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161053
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Nurses' Thinking About Analgesic Administration in Vignettes
Abstract:
Pediatric Nurses' Thinking About Analgesic Administration in Vignettes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Vincent, Catherine, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:Maternal-Child Nursing - Room 854, 845 S Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Researchers have found that up to 81% of hospitalized children report moderate to severe levels of pain and that pediatric nurses administered less amounts of analgesia than recommended by standards and available by physician order. Untreated pain has deleterious effects on multiple body functions resulting in delayed recovery, prolonged hospitalization, and can even lead to death. The purpose of this study was to better understand how pediatric nurses' think about and respond to a child experiencing postoperative pain in case study vignettes. Kaplan's theory of cognitive representation guided the study. Thirty nurses were asked to answer multiple-choice questions about two case study vignettes followed by an audiotaped semi-structured interview to explore their thinking about their pain assessment and morphine administration. Findings showed that nurses responded differently to a smiling child than to a grimacing child. Although nurses generally agreed that they would document the pain level that both children reported (8 on a scale of 0-10), they were more likely to administer morphine to the grimacing child. Qualitative content analysis revealed that when nurses perceived a mismatch between the smiling child's self-report of pain and the child's behavior, they would further assess the child's ability to use of the self-report scale. Furthermore, in addition to using self-report, behavior, and vital signs, nurses used information about the type of surgery, time since surgery, and response to the prior dose of morphine in making their choice how to medicate the children. Nevertheless, without changes in vital signs and/or behavior, most nurses would not administer additional morphine to the smiling child. Findings provide evidence of nurses' thinking about and response to children in pain and demonstrate their misconceptions about the reliance on vital signs and behavior to judge children's pain intensity. The information from this study provides nurses with important insights that can inform and guide interventions to relieve children's pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Nurses' Thinking About Analgesic Administration in Vignettesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161053-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pediatric Nurses' Thinking About Analgesic Administration in Vignettes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Catherine, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal-Child Nursing - Room 854, 845 S Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vincentc@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Researchers have found that up to 81% of hospitalized children report moderate to severe levels of pain and that pediatric nurses administered less amounts of analgesia than recommended by standards and available by physician order. Untreated pain has deleterious effects on multiple body functions resulting in delayed recovery, prolonged hospitalization, and can even lead to death. The purpose of this study was to better understand how pediatric nurses' think about and respond to a child experiencing postoperative pain in case study vignettes. Kaplan's theory of cognitive representation guided the study. Thirty nurses were asked to answer multiple-choice questions about two case study vignettes followed by an audiotaped semi-structured interview to explore their thinking about their pain assessment and morphine administration. Findings showed that nurses responded differently to a smiling child than to a grimacing child. Although nurses generally agreed that they would document the pain level that both children reported (8 on a scale of 0-10), they were more likely to administer morphine to the grimacing child. Qualitative content analysis revealed that when nurses perceived a mismatch between the smiling child's self-report of pain and the child's behavior, they would further assess the child's ability to use of the self-report scale. Furthermore, in addition to using self-report, behavior, and vital signs, nurses used information about the type of surgery, time since surgery, and response to the prior dose of morphine in making their choice how to medicate the children. Nevertheless, without changes in vital signs and/or behavior, most nurses would not administer additional morphine to the smiling child. Findings provide evidence of nurses' thinking about and response to children in pain and demonstrate their misconceptions about the reliance on vital signs and behavior to judge children's pain intensity. The information from this study provides nurses with important insights that can inform and guide interventions to relieve children's pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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