2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161055
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Postpartum Weight Management Desires, Expectation, and Plans
Abstract:
Postpartum Weight Management Desires, Expectation, and Plans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Weiss, Marianne, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Contact Address:, Kildeer, IL, 60047, USA
Co-Authors:P. Ryan, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
Retention of weight gained during pregnancy compounds women's age-related weight gain trajectory. The purpose of this report is to describe women's postpartum weight loss desires, expectations and plans. Theoretical Framework: Ryan's Integrated Model for Health Behavior Change (IMHBC). Methods: The study used a cluster sample of postpartum women without complications blocked on pre-pregnant weight and race/ethnicity. A questionnaire developed by the investigators based on the IMHBC was administered during the postpartum hospital stay. The sample consisted of 251 postpartum women: 47% (n=119) White, 43% (n=108) Black, 10% (n=24) Hispanic. Pre-pregnancy weight distribution was 37% (n=93) normal weight, 29% (n=72) overweight, 34% (n=86) obese. Results: Accuracy of self-reported pre-pregnant weight classification compared to documented weight was 90% for normal weight, 47% for overweight, 11% for obese. Post-pregnancy weight loss desires varied: 10% of the women wanted to lose some pregnancy weight, 37% all pregnancy weight, and 53% more than the pregnancy weight. Expectations for weight loss differed from desired: 25% expected some weight loss, 46% all of the pregnancy weight, 30% more that pregnancy weight. Mean per person differences between desires and expectations for postpartum weight loss were 1.4 pounds for normal weight women, 6.2 pounds for overweight women, and 19.1 for obese women. By race, mean differences between weight loss desires and expectations were 6.7, 10.4, and 12.5 pounds for White, Black, and Hispanic women respectively. Overweight and obese women reported greater concerns about losing weight, greater importance of the weight loss, more difficulty expected in losing the weight, and less confidence in ability to lose weight. White women expected greater difficulty losing pregnancy weight loss than Black women. Interaction effects between weight and race groups were found on concern, importance and confidence factors. Plans for weight loss will be reported by weight and race groups. Implications: Many women do not expect their weight loss goals to be realized. They identify weight loss as a concern and of sufficient importance to warrant development of specific intervention strategies to support their weight management goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePostpartum Weight Management Desires, Expectation, and Plansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161055-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Postpartum Weight Management Desires, Expectation, and Plans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weiss, Marianne, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Kildeer, IL, 60047, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marianne.weiss@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Ryan, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Retention of weight gained during pregnancy compounds women's age-related weight gain trajectory. The purpose of this report is to describe women's postpartum weight loss desires, expectations and plans. Theoretical Framework: Ryan's Integrated Model for Health Behavior Change (IMHBC). Methods: The study used a cluster sample of postpartum women without complications blocked on pre-pregnant weight and race/ethnicity. A questionnaire developed by the investigators based on the IMHBC was administered during the postpartum hospital stay. The sample consisted of 251 postpartum women: 47% (n=119) White, 43% (n=108) Black, 10% (n=24) Hispanic. Pre-pregnancy weight distribution was 37% (n=93) normal weight, 29% (n=72) overweight, 34% (n=86) obese. Results: Accuracy of self-reported pre-pregnant weight classification compared to documented weight was 90% for normal weight, 47% for overweight, 11% for obese. Post-pregnancy weight loss desires varied: 10% of the women wanted to lose some pregnancy weight, 37% all pregnancy weight, and 53% more than the pregnancy weight. Expectations for weight loss differed from desired: 25% expected some weight loss, 46% all of the pregnancy weight, 30% more that pregnancy weight. Mean per person differences between desires and expectations for postpartum weight loss were 1.4 pounds for normal weight women, 6.2 pounds for overweight women, and 19.1 for obese women. By race, mean differences between weight loss desires and expectations were 6.7, 10.4, and 12.5 pounds for White, Black, and Hispanic women respectively. Overweight and obese women reported greater concerns about losing weight, greater importance of the weight loss, more difficulty expected in losing the weight, and less confidence in ability to lose weight. White women expected greater difficulty losing pregnancy weight loss than Black women. Interaction effects between weight and race groups were found on concern, importance and confidence factors. Plans for weight loss will be reported by weight and race groups. Implications: Many women do not expect their weight loss goals to be realized. They identify weight loss as a concern and of sufficient importance to warrant development of specific intervention strategies to support their weight management goals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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