2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161057
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart rate Responses of Preterm Infants to Sound
Abstract:
Heart rate Responses of Preterm Infants to Sound
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:UIC- Room 806
Contact Address:Maternal/Child Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA
Co-Authors:M.N. Nelson and H. Lee, Maternal/Child Nursing, UIC, Chicago, IL; J.M. Silvestri, Pediatrics, Rush University, Chicago, IL; and H. Lee, Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL
Noise has been considered a potential source of stress in NICUs, yet it is unknown how preterm infants habituate to sound stimuli in the NICU. The cardiac orienting responses of 10 <1500 g birthweight preterm infants with normal hearing screen and head ultrasounds were tested via a series of single case designs. Heart rate (HR) responses to sound were evaluated weekly from 32 weeks gestational age through hospital discharge. Second x second changes in HR responding to10 sec pulsed auditory stimuli (65 dB, 500 or 750 Hz, pediatric headset) were recorded with 30 sec separating the 10 habituation and the 10 dishabituation trials. The order of presentation of the 2 frequencies was randomly selected for the first trial and counterbalanced each remaining week. Sessions began during sleep. Infants remained asleep during the sessions. HR was continuously recorded with a sample rate of 200 samples/sec. HR data were edited via a custom program and reduced into1-sec averages. The number of beats from baseline to peak HR response (difference), the slope from T1 (trial 1) - T10 (trial 10) for the initial repeating stimulus, the slope from T11-T20 for the novel stimulus, the sign (+/-) of the slopes from T1-T10 for the initial repeating and novel stimuli, and the time of recovery to baseline HR for each pulsed frequency were analyzed. GLM repeated-measures analyses with trend compared amplitude and direction of the infant's HR changes to sound over repeated trials. When weeks 32-36 were combined, no significant response was noted during T1-10 while a significant response was noted for the novel response during T12-17. A similar pattern was noted during T1-10 when each week was analyzed separately. However, during T11-20, responses differed significantly for week 34 (p < .02), week 35 (p < .03), and week 36 (p < .0001). Infants at 36 weeks had a second significant HR response at T18-20 (p < .04) suggesting anticipation of a third auditory stimulus. Infants with higher 5-min Apgar scores had lower HR responses (p < .03). HR responses to sound change over time and maturation produces a faster and larger HR response. Preterm infants may be vulnerable to large HR changes during transitions (incubator to crib).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart rate Responses of Preterm Infants to Sounden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161057-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart rate Responses of Preterm Infants to Sound</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UIC- Room 806</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal/Child Nursing, 845 South Damen, Chicago, IL, 60521, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.N. Nelson and H. Lee, Maternal/Child Nursing, UIC, Chicago, IL; J.M. Silvestri, Pediatrics, Rush University, Chicago, IL; and H. Lee, Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Noise has been considered a potential source of stress in NICUs, yet it is unknown how preterm infants habituate to sound stimuli in the NICU. The cardiac orienting responses of 10 &lt;1500 g birthweight preterm infants with normal hearing screen and head ultrasounds were tested via a series of single case designs. Heart rate (HR) responses to sound were evaluated weekly from 32 weeks gestational age through hospital discharge. Second x second changes in HR responding to10 sec pulsed auditory stimuli (65 dB, 500 or 750 Hz, pediatric headset) were recorded with 30 sec separating the 10 habituation and the 10 dishabituation trials. The order of presentation of the 2 frequencies was randomly selected for the first trial and counterbalanced each remaining week. Sessions began during sleep. Infants remained asleep during the sessions. HR was continuously recorded with a sample rate of 200 samples/sec. HR data were edited via a custom program and reduced into1-sec averages. The number of beats from baseline to peak HR response (difference), the slope from T1 (trial 1) - T10 (trial 10) for the initial repeating stimulus, the slope from T11-T20 for the novel stimulus, the sign (+/-) of the slopes from T1-T10 for the initial repeating and novel stimuli, and the time of recovery to baseline HR for each pulsed frequency were analyzed. GLM repeated-measures analyses with trend compared amplitude and direction of the infant's HR changes to sound over repeated trials. When weeks 32-36 were combined, no significant response was noted during T1-10 while a significant response was noted for the novel response during T12-17. A similar pattern was noted during T1-10 when each week was analyzed separately. However, during T11-20, responses differed significantly for week 34 (p &lt; .02), week 35 (p &lt; .03), and week 36 (p &lt; .0001). Infants at 36 weeks had a second significant HR response at T18-20 (p &lt; .04) suggesting anticipation of a third auditory stimulus. Infants with higher 5-min Apgar scores had lower HR responses (p &lt; .03). HR responses to sound change over time and maturation produces a faster and larger HR response. Preterm infants may be vulnerable to large HR changes during transitions (incubator to crib).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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