2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Nursing Intervention to Assist Success in Stressful Conditions
Abstract:
A Nursing Intervention to Assist Success in Stressful Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Williams, Reg, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Room 4352, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Co-Authors:B.M. Hagerty, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Young men and women are describing increasing stress in their daily lives. Inherent to starting new employment, going to college, or joining the military are multiple sources of stress such as: dramatic changes in living arrangements, separation from readily available and usual social supports, and intensive physical and emotional challenges. In turn, these factors affect interpersonal relationships, onset of physical and emotional stress symptoms, and, ultimately, performance and attrition. The purpose of this prospective cluster-randomized intervention trial was to determine the effects of a mental health intervention on young men and women. The intervention provides cognitive-behavioral approaches to problem solving, stress management, interpersonal relationships, and team building. Young men and women who were in a unique and specific controlled situation in which they were exposed to high levels of stress were selected from Navy recruits. There were 1199 recruits in the study. The intervention was provided weekly during the 9-weeks of basic training. The intervention groups developed significantly higher scores on group cohesion, problem solving coping strategies, and perceived social support, while reporting significantly less anger expression coping strategies than the control group. The intervention group reported significantly fewer physical injuries, and sought more support from other recruits as compared with the control groups. Salivary cortisols were collected each week and the mean cortisol levels in the intervention groups were significantly lower than in the control groups for male recruits at the most critical time during basic training. Potential cost savings per year for recruit training were estimated to be $18.6 million. Training facilitators and conducting the group intervention would cost an estimated $1.5 million per year. Those sailors that successful completed basic training were followed after two years. The Intervention sailors had a 1% higher rate of remaining in the Navy as compared to the Controls. Building on previous research, the results of this study provide support for the potential for this intervention to be a cost-effective method of helping young men and women to cope under stressful conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Nursing Intervention to Assist Success in Stressful Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Nursing Intervention to Assist Success in Stressful Conditions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Reg, PhD, RN, CS, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Room 4352, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rawill@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.M. Hagerty, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Young men and women are describing increasing stress in their daily lives. Inherent to starting new employment, going to college, or joining the military are multiple sources of stress such as: dramatic changes in living arrangements, separation from readily available and usual social supports, and intensive physical and emotional challenges. In turn, these factors affect interpersonal relationships, onset of physical and emotional stress symptoms, and, ultimately, performance and attrition. The purpose of this prospective cluster-randomized intervention trial was to determine the effects of a mental health intervention on young men and women. The intervention provides cognitive-behavioral approaches to problem solving, stress management, interpersonal relationships, and team building. Young men and women who were in a unique and specific controlled situation in which they were exposed to high levels of stress were selected from Navy recruits. There were 1199 recruits in the study. The intervention was provided weekly during the 9-weeks of basic training. The intervention groups developed significantly higher scores on group cohesion, problem solving coping strategies, and perceived social support, while reporting significantly less anger expression coping strategies than the control group. The intervention group reported significantly fewer physical injuries, and sought more support from other recruits as compared with the control groups. Salivary cortisols were collected each week and the mean cortisol levels in the intervention groups were significantly lower than in the control groups for male recruits at the most critical time during basic training. Potential cost savings per year for recruit training were estimated to be $18.6 million. Training facilitators and conducting the group intervention would cost an estimated $1.5 million per year. Those sailors that successful completed basic training were followed after two years. The Intervention sailors had a 1% higher rate of remaining in the Navy as compared to the Controls. Building on previous research, the results of this study provide support for the potential for this intervention to be a cost-effective method of helping young men and women to cope under stressful conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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