2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161063
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Nursing Faculty's Teaching Practices about the Presence of Humor
Abstract:
Examining Nursing Faculty's Teaching Practices about the Presence of Humor
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Adamle, Kathleen, PhD, MSN, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8837
Co-Authors:Lenny Chiang-Hanisko, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RN, C, CNS, Professor; and Richard Zeller, PhD, MA, Biostatistician
The purpose of this cross cultural study was to examine nursing faculty's teaching practices about humor theory and concepts in nursing courses and curriculums, especially regarding end of life care. This was a preliminary survey using a sample of 153 nursing faculty from four nursing programs, two in the United States, one in Northern Ireland, and one in Taiwan. The framework used social interaction theory, which explains that people act on the basis of "meanings" that have evolved from personal interaction and subjective interpretation. The method used an exploratory descriptive design to discover teaching practices of nursing faculty and determine if they included the concept of humor or humor theory in (1) didactic lecture, (2) in the clinical setting, or (3) in their nursing curriculum. A questionnaire was used to collect data over a 6 month period. Analysis included descriptive statistics for the quantitative data and content analysis for the qualitative data. Results showed a significant difference between faculty from the cultural perspectives of West and East. The faculty in the West identified the presence of humor in the clinical settings and discussed humor with their students in a post-clinical conference. However few faculty from the West reported inclusion of humor theory or concepts of humor in lecture or curriculum. Faculty from the East included humor in the nursing curriculum and lectures, but reported little humor presence in the clinical setting. The relevance shows that (1) nursing educators recognize the concept of humor when the presence of humor is noted in clinical settings but do not include it in nursing curriculums and (2) differences in cultural aspects of East and West show quite the opposite results. More research is needed to assess the presence of humor in clinical settings and the inclusion of humor theory and concepts in nursing education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Nursing Faculty's Teaching Practices about the Presence of Humoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161063-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Nursing Faculty's Teaching Practices about the Presence of Humor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Adamle, Kathleen, PhD, MSN, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8837</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kadamle@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lenny Chiang-Hanisko, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RN, C, CNS, Professor; and Richard Zeller, PhD, MA, Biostatistician</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this cross cultural study was to examine nursing faculty's teaching practices about humor theory and concepts in nursing courses and curriculums, especially regarding end of life care. This was a preliminary survey using a sample of 153 nursing faculty from four nursing programs, two in the United States, one in Northern Ireland, and one in Taiwan. The framework used social interaction theory, which explains that people act on the basis of &quot;meanings&quot; that have evolved from personal interaction and subjective interpretation. The method used an exploratory descriptive design to discover teaching practices of nursing faculty and determine if they included the concept of humor or humor theory in (1) didactic lecture, (2) in the clinical setting, or (3) in their nursing curriculum. A questionnaire was used to collect data over a 6 month period. Analysis included descriptive statistics for the quantitative data and content analysis for the qualitative data. Results showed a significant difference between faculty from the cultural perspectives of West and East. The faculty in the West identified the presence of humor in the clinical settings and discussed humor with their students in a post-clinical conference. However few faculty from the West reported inclusion of humor theory or concepts of humor in lecture or curriculum. Faculty from the East included humor in the nursing curriculum and lectures, but reported little humor presence in the clinical setting. The relevance shows that (1) nursing educators recognize the concept of humor when the presence of humor is noted in clinical settings but do not include it in nursing curriculums and (2) differences in cultural aspects of East and West show quite the opposite results. More research is needed to assess the presence of humor in clinical settings and the inclusion of humor theory and concepts in nursing education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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