2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161066
Type:
Presentation
Title:
University Worksite Intervention to Increase Physical Activity
Abstract:
University Worksite Intervention to Increase Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Anne, Thomas, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Health Promotion, 400 North Ingalls, Room 3189, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-647-0152
Co-Authors:Kimberlee Gretebeck, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; OiSaeng Hong, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; and SeonAe Yeo, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Significance: A sedentary lifestyle is identified as a strong risk factor for chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Since many faculty and office staff working in an academic setting have sedentary jobs, a behavioral lifestyle intervention delivered in the worksite is an effective strategy to reach this group of adults who may not regularly participate in physical activity (PA) within or outside of work. The investigators were interested in developing an effective worksite intervention that may contribute to faculty and staff health promotion by increasing PA at work. Aims: 1) Examine theory based variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior related to self-reported PA; 2) Examine the impact of a specific worksite PA program on PA behavior, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). Methods: The pilot project used focus groups and a pre and post test design over a 12 week period during the academic year. All faculty and staff at a Midwestern School of Nursing were eligible to participate (N=246). The intervention included daily PA monitoring using pedometers, educational classes, motivational signs within the school, bi-weekly e-mails and a specially designed website with PA information. Results: Repeated analysis of variance revealed that the worksite PA intervention increased behavioral and attitudinal beliefs related to worksite PA. Trends related to the BMI post intervention included: 1) younger subjects had higher BMI values, middle-aged subjects had lower values and the older age group remained the same and; 2) baccalaureate and doctorally educated subjects had higher BMI measures after the intervention while master's educated subjects had higher values pre-intervention. Time was marginally significant (p=0.062) for decreases in blood pressure. Conclusions: Findings suggest promising results of a work-site intervention to increase walking at the work site. Decreases in self-efficacy suggest the need for stronger motivational boosters throughout the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUniversity Worksite Intervention to Increase Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161066-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">University Worksite Intervention to Increase Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anne, Thomas, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Health Promotion, 400 North Ingalls, Room 3189, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-647-0152</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">annethom@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kimberlee Gretebeck, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; OiSaeng Hong, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; and SeonAe Yeo, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significance: A sedentary lifestyle is identified as a strong risk factor for chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Since many faculty and office staff working in an academic setting have sedentary jobs, a behavioral lifestyle intervention delivered in the worksite is an effective strategy to reach this group of adults who may not regularly participate in physical activity (PA) within or outside of work. The investigators were interested in developing an effective worksite intervention that may contribute to faculty and staff health promotion by increasing PA at work. Aims: 1) Examine theory based variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior related to self-reported PA; 2) Examine the impact of a specific worksite PA program on PA behavior, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). Methods: The pilot project used focus groups and a pre and post test design over a 12 week period during the academic year. All faculty and staff at a Midwestern School of Nursing were eligible to participate (N=246). The intervention included daily PA monitoring using pedometers, educational classes, motivational signs within the school, bi-weekly e-mails and a specially designed website with PA information. Results: Repeated analysis of variance revealed that the worksite PA intervention increased behavioral and attitudinal beliefs related to worksite PA. Trends related to the BMI post intervention included: 1) younger subjects had higher BMI values, middle-aged subjects had lower values and the older age group remained the same and; 2) baccalaureate and doctorally educated subjects had higher BMI measures after the intervention while master's educated subjects had higher values pre-intervention. Time was marginally significant (p=0.062) for decreases in blood pressure. Conclusions: Findings suggest promising results of a work-site intervention to increase walking at the work site. Decreases in self-efficacy suggest the need for stronger motivational boosters throughout the intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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