2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161067
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression, Stress, and Blood Pressure in Urban African American Women
Abstract:
Depression, Stress, and Blood Pressure in Urban African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 577-4143
Co-Authors:Olivia Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, Associate Professor; John M. Flack, MD, MPH, Professor; Elaine M Hockman, PhD, Biostatistician; and Kai-Lin Catherine Jen, PhD, Professor
Hypertension is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among African American women. Depression and stress have been linked to several adverse cardiovascular outcomes and may be important factors to consider when treating urban African American women with hypertension. A descriptive correlational design was used to test the following hypotheses: (a) African American women with higher levels of depression will have higher blood pressure (BP) levels, more cardiovascular risk factors, greater stress, and lower social support; and (b) depression will mediate the relationship between stress and blood pressure. A convenience sample of 245 hypertensive African American women (mean age 61 years +/- 12.7) was recruited through free BP screenings offered in the community. Data were obtained by structured interview using 3-day food recalls, the 7-day Physical Activity Recall, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the ENRICHD social support instrument. Body weight and composition, height, and BP measures were also obtained. Pearson r correlation coefficients, ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the study's hypotheses. Women with higher levels of depression had higher diastolic BP (r = .258, p < .001), were more likely to smoke [F (2,242) = 9.74, p < .001], eat fewer fruits and vegetables(r = -.174, p < .015), have more stress (r = .689, p <.001), and less social support (r = -.449, p < .001). The criteria for mediation were satisfied. Depression mediated the effects of stress on diastolic BP. The findings emphasize the importance of assessing both behavioral and psychosocial factors in urban hypertensive African American women, and that relieving depression may attenuate the impact of stress on diastolic BP.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression, Stress, and Blood Pressure in Urban African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161067-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression, Stress, and Blood Pressure in Urban African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Artinian, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 577-4143</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">n.artinian@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Olivia Washington, PhD, APRN, BC, Associate Professor; John M. Flack, MD, MPH, Professor; Elaine M Hockman, PhD, Biostatistician; and Kai-Lin Catherine Jen, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hypertension is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among African American women. Depression and stress have been linked to several adverse cardiovascular outcomes and may be important factors to consider when treating urban African American women with hypertension. A descriptive correlational design was used to test the following hypotheses: (a) African American women with higher levels of depression will have higher blood pressure (BP) levels, more cardiovascular risk factors, greater stress, and lower social support; and (b) depression will mediate the relationship between stress and blood pressure. A convenience sample of 245 hypertensive African American women (mean age 61 years +/- 12.7) was recruited through free BP screenings offered in the community. Data were obtained by structured interview using 3-day food recalls, the 7-day Physical Activity Recall, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the ENRICHD social support instrument. Body weight and composition, height, and BP measures were also obtained. Pearson r correlation coefficients, ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the study's hypotheses. Women with higher levels of depression had higher diastolic BP (r = .258, p &lt; .001), were more likely to smoke [F (2,242) = 9.74, p &lt; .001], eat fewer fruits and vegetables(r = -.174, p &lt; .015), have more stress (r = .689, p &lt;.001), and less social support (r = -.449, p &lt; .001). The criteria for mediation were satisfied. Depression mediated the effects of stress on diastolic BP. The findings emphasize the importance of assessing both behavioral and psychosocial factors in urban hypertensive African American women, and that relieving depression may attenuate the impact of stress on diastolic BP.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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