Effect of Guided Imagery/Relaxation on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women with Osteoarthritis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161068
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Guided Imagery/Relaxation on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women with Osteoarthritis
Abstract:
Effect of Guided Imagery/Relaxation on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women with Osteoarthritis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Baird, Carol, DNS, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 502 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
Contact Telephone:465/494-4036
Co-Authors:Laura P. Sands, PhD, Associate Professor
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of disability in older adults which in turn leads to poor quality of life (QOL). The disability is primarily caused by the joint degeneration and pain. Purpose: A randomized pilot study was conducted to test the effectiveness of guided imagery with relaxation (GIR), a self-management intervention, to improve health-related QOL (HRQOL) in women with OA. This study sought to determine whether GIR leads to better HRQOL in these individuals and whether improvement in HRQOL could be attributed to intervention-associated improvements in pain and mobility. Theoretical/conceptual framework: The biopsychosocial theory of chronic pain and the psychoneuromuscular theory supported the design of the study. Mechanisms by which GIR might improve HRQOL in individuals with OA include pain reduction, thorough blocking nociceptic transmission and initiating cognitive processes, and improved mobility, through mentally rehearsing movement without pain. Subjects/methods: A two-group longitudinal design was used. Twenty-eight women were randomized to either GIR intervention or control intervention group. Results: Results of the pilot study revealed that using GIR for 12 weeks significantly increased their total HRQOL when compared to the women who used the control intervention. Even after statistically controlling for pain and mobility changes, there were significantly greater improvements from baseline to 12 weeks in an abbreviated HRQOL scale that did not assess pain or mobility. Linear regression analyses revealed that change in mobility, but not change in pain, was significantly associated with the abbreviated HRQOL scores at 12 weeks after controlling for the baseline abbreviated HRQOL score. Conclusions: Analyses confirmed that GIR-associated improvements in other domains of QOL were not completely explained by improvements in pain and mobility. This suggests that GIR has promise for helping OA patients living with the many consequences of OA, including depressed daily social and emotional functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Guided Imagery/Relaxation on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women with Osteoarthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161068-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Guided Imagery/Relaxation on Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women with Osteoarthritis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baird, Carol, DNS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 502 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">465/494-4036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bairdcl@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura P. Sands, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of disability in older adults which in turn leads to poor quality of life (QOL). The disability is primarily caused by the joint degeneration and pain. Purpose: A randomized pilot study was conducted to test the effectiveness of guided imagery with relaxation (GIR), a self-management intervention, to improve health-related QOL (HRQOL) in women with OA. This study sought to determine whether GIR leads to better HRQOL in these individuals and whether improvement in HRQOL could be attributed to intervention-associated improvements in pain and mobility. Theoretical/conceptual framework: The biopsychosocial theory of chronic pain and the psychoneuromuscular theory supported the design of the study. Mechanisms by which GIR might improve HRQOL in individuals with OA include pain reduction, thorough blocking nociceptic transmission and initiating cognitive processes, and improved mobility, through mentally rehearsing movement without pain. Subjects/methods: A two-group longitudinal design was used. Twenty-eight women were randomized to either GIR intervention or control intervention group. Results: Results of the pilot study revealed that using GIR for 12 weeks significantly increased their total HRQOL when compared to the women who used the control intervention. Even after statistically controlling for pain and mobility changes, there were significantly greater improvements from baseline to 12 weeks in an abbreviated HRQOL scale that did not assess pain or mobility. Linear regression analyses revealed that change in mobility, but not change in pain, was significantly associated with the abbreviated HRQOL scores at 12 weeks after controlling for the baseline abbreviated HRQOL score. Conclusions: Analyses confirmed that GIR-associated improvements in other domains of QOL were not completely explained by improvements in pain and mobility. This suggests that GIR has promise for helping OA patients living with the many consequences of OA, including depressed daily social and emotional functioning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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