Talking Circles: Northern Plains Tribes American Indian Women's Views of Cancer as a Health Issue

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161069
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Talking Circles: Northern Plains Tribes American Indian Women's Views of Cancer as a Health Issue
Abstract:
Talking Circles: Northern Plains Tribes American Indian Women's Views of Cancer as a Health Issue
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Becker, Sara, PhDc, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, SDSU West River Program- 1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA
Contact Telephone:605-394-5390
Problem: The five-year relative survival rates for all United States women diagnosed with breast cancer are poorer for American Indians than any other ethnic or cultural group, attributable in part to late-stage diagnosis. Early detection via breast cancer screening in medically underserved populations is a targeted priority for Healthy People 2010 Objectives. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to understand the cultural meanings of cancer among American Indian women from the Northern Plains tribes, and their emic perspective of breast and cervical cancer screening. Design and Sample: Using an exploratory design, a purposive sample of 28 women, 35-75 years of age, were recruited into three Talking Circles. Measurement: Talking Circle and focus group methodology, combined with Affonso's Focus Groups Analytic Schema, were used to generate contextual data sets including thematic findings. Results: Ten themes emerged indicating interrelationships between cultural traditions and health structures of care. The themes provided a unique nursing perspective for conceptualizing women's experiences with breast and cervical cancer screening. Conclusions: Incorporating women's cultural experiences into screening services is necessary to address clinical practice and policy challenges for reducing breast and cervical cancer mortality among American Indian women. Findings from this research will be used to guide a future study investigating breast screening patterns related to mammography adherence and development of nursing interventions specific to American Indian women.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTalking Circles: Northern Plains Tribes American Indian Women's Views of Cancer as a Health Issueen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161069-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Talking Circles: Northern Plains Tribes American Indian Women's Views of Cancer as a Health Issue</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Becker, Sara, PhDc, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, SDSU West River Program- 1011 11th Street, Rapid City, SD, 57701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605-394-5390</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sara.becker@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The five-year relative survival rates for all United States women diagnosed with breast cancer are poorer for American Indians than any other ethnic or cultural group, attributable in part to late-stage diagnosis. Early detection via breast cancer screening in medically underserved populations is a targeted priority for Healthy People 2010 Objectives. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to understand the cultural meanings of cancer among American Indian women from the Northern Plains tribes, and their emic perspective of breast and cervical cancer screening. Design and Sample: Using an exploratory design, a purposive sample of 28 women, 35-75 years of age, were recruited into three Talking Circles. Measurement: Talking Circle and focus group methodology, combined with Affonso's Focus Groups Analytic Schema, were used to generate contextual data sets including thematic findings. Results: Ten themes emerged indicating interrelationships between cultural traditions and health structures of care. The themes provided a unique nursing perspective for conceptualizing women's experiences with breast and cervical cancer screening. Conclusions: Incorporating women's cultural experiences into screening services is necessary to address clinical practice and policy challenges for reducing breast and cervical cancer mortality among American Indian women. Findings from this research will be used to guide a future study investigating breast screening patterns related to mammography adherence and development of nursing interventions specific to American Indian women. <br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.