2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161073
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients: A Unitary Pattern Portrait
Abstract:
Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients: A Unitary Pattern Portrait
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Brady, Noreen, RN, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-1867
Co-Authors:Dianna L Morris, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor; May Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean; Jaclene A Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Atwood Gaines, PhD
Purpose: To increase understanding of siblings' experiences and perceptions of living in a family with a sibling with schizophrenia. A sibling's symptomatic behavior may be associated with distress and confusion for brothers and sisters. Parents are often hard-pressed to meet family needs as they struggle to understand the ill child's symptoms and behavior. Increased understanding of siblings' experiences may enable nurses to plan interventions early in the course of illness to enhance family life and functioning.

Theoretical Framework: The Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUBH) and the Unitary Field Pattern Portrait (UFPP) research method (Butcher, 1994, 1998) provided the conceptual foundation and method used in the original study from which these sibling data were extracted and synthesized.

Participants and Methods: Three of six families participating in the original study had siblings, all sisters. Audio-taped, in-person, open-ended interviews were conducted and transcribed. Data from these four siblings were then synthesized following the UFPP method outlined by Butcher.

Results: A strong sense of family commitment strengthen these sisters' resolve to remain active and connected to their adult consumer brothers. Childhood memories remain of uncertainty and the need for constant preparation for many sudden behavior and mood changes in their brothers. Holidays and special occasions were especially stressful. Conscious decisions to conceal negative aspects of the ill sibling and family life were made and friends were not brought home. Basic information was lacking about schizophrenia and these sisters found it necessary to look outside the family for information.

Conclusions: Additional study of sibling's perceptions and experiences with a brother or sister with schizophrenia may assist nurses develop and deliver nursing interventions to families as soon as a diagnosis of schizophrenia is made.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSiblings of Schizophrenia Patients: A Unitary Pattern Portraiten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161073-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Siblings of Schizophrenia Patients: A Unitary Pattern Portrait</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brady, Noreen, RN, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-1867</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nxb7@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dianna L Morris, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor; May Wykle, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean; Jaclene A Zauszniewski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Theresa Standing, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; and Atwood Gaines, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To increase understanding of siblings' experiences and perceptions of living in a family with a sibling with schizophrenia. A sibling's symptomatic behavior may be associated with distress and confusion for brothers and sisters. Parents are often hard-pressed to meet family needs as they struggle to understand the ill child's symptoms and behavior. Increased understanding of siblings' experiences may enable nurses to plan interventions early in the course of illness to enhance family life and functioning. <br/><br/>Theoretical Framework: The Science of Unitary Human Beings (SUBH) and the Unitary Field Pattern Portrait (UFPP) research method (Butcher, 1994, 1998) provided the conceptual foundation and method used in the original study from which these sibling data were extracted and synthesized. <br/><br/>Participants and Methods: Three of six families participating in the original study had siblings, all sisters. Audio-taped, in-person, open-ended interviews were conducted and transcribed. Data from these four siblings were then synthesized following the UFPP method outlined by Butcher. <br/><br/>Results: A strong sense of family commitment strengthen these sisters' resolve to remain active and connected to their adult consumer brothers. Childhood memories remain of uncertainty and the need for constant preparation for many sudden behavior and mood changes in their brothers. Holidays and special occasions were especially stressful. Conscious decisions to conceal negative aspects of the ill sibling and family life were made and friends were not brought home. Basic information was lacking about schizophrenia and these sisters found it necessary to look outside the family for information. <br/><br/>Conclusions: Additional study of sibling's perceptions and experiences with a brother or sister with schizophrenia may assist nurses develop and deliver nursing interventions to families as soon as a diagnosis of schizophrenia is made.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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