2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161077
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Culturally Competent Nursing Care
Abstract:
Assessing Culturally Competent Nursing Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Buratti, Michele, MSN, BSN, RN, N/A
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University Medical Center
Title:Unit Educator
Contact Address:Critical Care Nursing, 245 Salerma Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15220, USA
Contact Telephone:412-600-9056
Purpose: The U.S. reflects an increasingly multicultural population. It is unknown to what extent this increasing multiculturalism is paralleled by increases in the provision of culturally competent care. The research aims of this study include: (a) What are the existing levels of cultural competence among registered nurses? (b) What person-specific demographics and nursing environment characteristics are associated with these levels of cultural competency? Theoretical Framework: Campinha-Bacote's (2003) Culturally Competent Model of Care, provided the framework. Cultural competence is viewed as an ongoing process in which the health care provider continuously strives to achieve the ability to effectively work within the cultural context of the client. Subjects: A convenience sample (n = 66) of Registered Nurses working in a large acute care academic hospital from across five inpatient clinical units. Methods: This pilot study utilized a cross-sectional study design with survey methodology. Instruments included a 41 - item questionnaire consisting of two parts: (a) 16-item investigator develop demographic questionnaire and (b) 25-item cultural competence tool, the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professional-Revised (IAPCC-R) as developed by Campinha-Bacote (2003). Data analyses included descriptive, t-tests, Pearson's r correlation coefficient, and one-way ANOVA. Results: Results revealed a vast majority of nurses operating in the "Culturally Aware" category, the second to the lowest category of the IAPCC-R indicating relatively low proficiency in cultural issues. Variables associated with higher cultural competence scores included higher levels of nursing education, attendance to cultural programs, and awareness of training offered by the hospital. Conclusion: Findings suggest that practicing nurses are potentially delivering "unconscious incompetent" care. Increased cultural competency training needs to exist within our academic institutions and fostered by our health systems. The nurse educator role is vital in their collaboration with health organizations towards the implementation of cultural competencies. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Culturally Competent Nursing Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161077-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Culturally Competent Nursing Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buratti, Michele, MSN, BSN, RN, N/A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Unit Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Critical Care Nursing, 245 Salerma Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">412-600-9056</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chita1@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The U.S. reflects an increasingly multicultural population. It is unknown to what extent this increasing multiculturalism is paralleled by increases in the provision of culturally competent care. The research aims of this study include: (a) What are the existing levels of cultural competence among registered nurses? (b) What person-specific demographics and nursing environment characteristics are associated with these levels of cultural competency? Theoretical Framework: Campinha-Bacote's (2003) Culturally Competent Model of Care, provided the framework. Cultural competence is viewed as an ongoing process in which the health care provider continuously strives to achieve the ability to effectively work within the cultural context of the client. Subjects: A convenience sample (n = 66) of Registered Nurses working in a large acute care academic hospital from across five inpatient clinical units. Methods: This pilot study utilized a cross-sectional study design with survey methodology. Instruments included a 41 - item questionnaire consisting of two parts: (a) 16-item investigator develop demographic questionnaire and (b) 25-item cultural competence tool, the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professional-Revised (IAPCC-R) as developed by Campinha-Bacote (2003). Data analyses included descriptive, t-tests, Pearson's r correlation coefficient, and one-way ANOVA. Results: Results revealed a vast majority of nurses operating in the &quot;Culturally Aware&quot; category, the second to the lowest category of the IAPCC-R indicating relatively low proficiency in cultural issues. Variables associated with higher cultural competence scores included higher levels of nursing education, attendance to cultural programs, and awareness of training offered by the hospital. Conclusion: Findings suggest that practicing nurses are potentially delivering &quot;unconscious incompetent&quot; care. Increased cultural competency training needs to exist within our academic institutions and fostered by our health systems. The nurse educator role is vital in their collaboration with health organizations towards the implementation of cultural competencies. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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