2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161079
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Abstract:
Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cheung, Corjena, PhD, MS, BA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:College of St. Catherine
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 2004 Randolph Ave, St. Paul, MN, 55119, USA
Contact Telephone:651-690-6040
Although research suggests that significant numbers of people utilize various forms of complementary/alternative therapies (C/AT), knowledge about C/AT use in older adults remains limited. The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence and patterns of C/AT use among community-dwelling older adults, to describe the characteristics of older C/AT users, and to identify factors associated with C/AT use. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A random sample of 1,200 community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and over was selected from the Minnesota Driver's License/Identification Database. The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical framework to examine the factors that influence C/AT use. Based on 445 completed surveys (37% response rate), 62.9% of the respondents reported use of C/AT with an average of three therapies used per individual (SD +/- 1.9, range 1-11). The most prevalent therapies were nutritional supplements (44.3%), spiritual healing (29.7%), and megavitamins (28.3%). Maintaining health and treating a health condition were the primary reasons for C/AT use. The most common conditions treated were arthritis (44.4%) and chronic pain (23.5%). A desire for more control over health and symptoms of health problems were the major influencing factors. The main barriers were lack of reason to use and not believing C/AT would work. C/AT users were significantly sicker than non-users. Demographic variables did not predict C/AT use. Regular exercise was predictive of overall and high level of C/AT use. High satisfaction (80%) with C/AT use was reported. Only 53% of users disclose C/AT use to their primary care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Community-Dwelling Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161079-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Community-Dwelling Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cheung, Corjena, PhD, MS, BA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of St. Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 2004 Randolph Ave, St. Paul, MN, 55119, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">651-690-6040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ckcheung@stkate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although research suggests that significant numbers of people utilize various forms of complementary/alternative therapies (C/AT), knowledge about C/AT use in older adults remains limited. The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence and patterns of C/AT use among community-dwelling older adults, to describe the characteristics of older C/AT users, and to identify factors associated with C/AT use. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A random sample of 1,200 community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and over was selected from the Minnesota Driver's License/Identification Database. The Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical framework to examine the factors that influence C/AT use. Based on 445 completed surveys (37% response rate), 62.9% of the respondents reported use of C/AT with an average of three therapies used per individual (SD +/- 1.9, range 1-11). The most prevalent therapies were nutritional supplements (44.3%), spiritual healing (29.7%), and megavitamins (28.3%). Maintaining health and treating a health condition were the primary reasons for C/AT use. The most common conditions treated were arthritis (44.4%) and chronic pain (23.5%). A desire for more control over health and symptoms of health problems were the major influencing factors. The main barriers were lack of reason to use and not believing C/AT would work. C/AT users were significantly sicker than non-users. Demographic variables did not predict C/AT use. Regular exercise was predictive of overall and high level of C/AT use. High satisfaction (80%) with C/AT use was reported. Only 53% of users disclose C/AT use to their primary care providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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