2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161080
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meeting In-Home Care Receiver's Emotional Needs
Abstract:
Meeting In-Home Care Receiver's Emotional Needs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Coeling, Harriet, PhD, MS, BSN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8787
Co-Authors:Greg Smith, PhD, Professor; Nichole Egbert, PhD, MA, BA, Assistant Professor; Robert Johnson, PhD, Professor; and Mary Dellman-Jenkins, PhD, Professor
Problem: In-home caregivers (CGs) share informally their disappointment in not being able to meet their care receivers' (CRs') emotional needs. Yet little research has been reported on how informal CGs perceive their ability to meet CR emotional needs or the effect of these perceptions on CG well-being. This study, part of a larger study assessing the status of informal care in the home, sought to determine if perceived difficulty in meeting CR's emotional needs was significantly related to the CG psychological well-being (PWB) after controlling for salient demographic and care-related variables. Theoretical Perspective: This study was grounded in the Theory of Caregiver and Care Receiver Dyadic Identity Development. Methodology and Design: Primary family CGs (N=79) of frail older adults throughout Ohio were interviewed via telephone using the 3-Item Psychological General Well-Being Index and the Informal Care Assessment Instrument. Analysis and Interpretation of Findings: Hierarchical multiple regression was performed with predictors entered in the following blocks: Socio-Demographics (age, gender, perceived health), Care-Related Variables (hours/week), Perceived Difficulty Providing for Physical Needs, and Perceived Difficulty Providing for Emotional Needs. The final model, with blocks in the above order, accounted for 36% of the variance in CG PWB with greater CG PWB associated with being younger, in better health, and perceiving oneself as able to meet CR's emotional needs. This study expands previously reported work, providing support for the Theory of CG/CR Dyadic Identity and emphasizing the need for CGs and CRs to recognize each other's needs and set mutual care expectations. Relevance to Nursing Practice: Nurses are encouraged to assist care dyads to recognize mutual needs and set mutual expectations for meeting CR emotional needs so as to decrease the distress occurring when CGs perceive themselves as less than adequate in meeting CR emotional needs. Funded by Kent State University Research Council
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeeting In-Home Care Receiver's Emotional Needsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161080-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meeting In-Home Care Receiver's Emotional Needs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coeling, Harriet, PhD, MS, BSN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8787</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hcoeling@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Greg Smith, PhD, Professor; Nichole Egbert, PhD, MA, BA, Assistant Professor; Robert Johnson, PhD, Professor; and Mary Dellman-Jenkins, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: In-home caregivers (CGs) share informally their disappointment in not being able to meet their care receivers' (CRs') emotional needs. Yet little research has been reported on how informal CGs perceive their ability to meet CR emotional needs or the effect of these perceptions on CG well-being. This study, part of a larger study assessing the status of informal care in the home, sought to determine if perceived difficulty in meeting CR's emotional needs was significantly related to the CG psychological well-being (PWB) after controlling for salient demographic and care-related variables. Theoretical Perspective: This study was grounded in the Theory of Caregiver and Care Receiver Dyadic Identity Development. Methodology and Design: Primary family CGs (N=79) of frail older adults throughout Ohio were interviewed via telephone using the 3-Item Psychological General Well-Being Index and the Informal Care Assessment Instrument. Analysis and Interpretation of Findings: Hierarchical multiple regression was performed with predictors entered in the following blocks: Socio-Demographics (age, gender, perceived health), Care-Related Variables (hours/week), Perceived Difficulty Providing for Physical Needs, and Perceived Difficulty Providing for Emotional Needs. The final model, with blocks in the above order, accounted for 36% of the variance in CG PWB with greater CG PWB associated with being younger, in better health, and perceiving oneself as able to meet CR's emotional needs. This study expands previously reported work, providing support for the Theory of CG/CR Dyadic Identity and emphasizing the need for CGs and CRs to recognize each other's needs and set mutual care expectations. Relevance to Nursing Practice: Nurses are encouraged to assist care dyads to recognize mutual needs and set mutual expectations for meeting CR emotional needs so as to decrease the distress occurring when CGs perceive themselves as less than adequate in meeting CR emotional needs. Funded by Kent State University Research Council</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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