Identifying and Measuring Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Students' Moral Sensitivity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161081
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying and Measuring Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Students' Moral Sensitivity
Abstract:
Identifying and Measuring Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Students' Moral Sensitivity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Comrie, Rhonda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Primary Care & Health Systems Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2308 - Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3935
Nurses deal with complex situations that require moral choices while balancing the severity of the patient population, a shortage of nursing staff, and difficult working conditions. This research examined the level of moral sensitivity among junior, senior, and graduate nursing students. It assessed how baccalaureate and graduate nursing students think about their capacity to identify, define, and act on moral dilemmas. Moral Sensitivity Grounded Theory (Lutzen,1993) was the conceptual basis; Tronto's Ethic of Care (1993) supported data analysis. A mixed methods research design was used to identify and measure moral sensitivity. Quantitative data were obtained using the Modified Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire for Student Nurses. Findings helped determine and explain the moral issues students believed important, using a convenience sample of 250 students at a university school of nursing. Qualitative data was obtained using interviews based on patient care vignettes with five female students from each of the three classes. Students identified moral issues in the vignettes. Statistical analysis of survey data included descriptive statistics and analysis of variance and post hoc tests for between group differences on survey categories and individual survey items. Interviews were analyzed for themes. The results of the survey and naturalistic interview analyses were integrated, matching the survey data to interview categories and comparing interview themes with specific survey items. Interviews resulted in five categories of moral issues: Attentiveness to Patients and their Rights as Autonomous Individuals; Attentiveness to Promotion and Inhibition of Care: Benevolence; Attentiveness to an Interpersonal Orientation: Honesty and Trust; Attentiveness to Overall Well-being of the Patient; and Attentiveness to the Limits of the Nurse's Authority. Highest ranking survey issues were: honesty, respecting patient self-choice, knowing patient situations, relying on expert knowledge, and interpersonal relationships. Results support the need for contextually-based nursing ethics education, focusing on identifying and resolving moral issues nurses encounter. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying and Measuring Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Students' Moral Sensitivityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161081-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identifying and Measuring Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Students' Moral Sensitivity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Comrie, Rhonda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Primary Care &amp; Health Systems Nursing, Alumni Hall, Room 2308 - Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rcomrie@siue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses deal with complex situations that require moral choices while balancing the severity of the patient population, a shortage of nursing staff, and difficult working conditions. This research examined the level of moral sensitivity among junior, senior, and graduate nursing students. It assessed how baccalaureate and graduate nursing students think about their capacity to identify, define, and act on moral dilemmas. Moral Sensitivity Grounded Theory (Lutzen,1993) was the conceptual basis; Tronto's Ethic of Care (1993) supported data analysis. A mixed methods research design was used to identify and measure moral sensitivity. Quantitative data were obtained using the Modified Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire for Student Nurses. Findings helped determine and explain the moral issues students believed important, using a convenience sample of 250 students at a university school of nursing. Qualitative data was obtained using interviews based on patient care vignettes with five female students from each of the three classes. Students identified moral issues in the vignettes. Statistical analysis of survey data included descriptive statistics and analysis of variance and post hoc tests for between group differences on survey categories and individual survey items. Interviews were analyzed for themes. The results of the survey and naturalistic interview analyses were integrated, matching the survey data to interview categories and comparing interview themes with specific survey items. Interviews resulted in five categories of moral issues: Attentiveness to Patients and their Rights as Autonomous Individuals; Attentiveness to Promotion and Inhibition of Care: Benevolence; Attentiveness to an Interpersonal Orientation: Honesty and Trust; Attentiveness to Overall Well-being of the Patient; and Attentiveness to the Limits of the Nurse's Authority. Highest ranking survey issues were: honesty, respecting patient self-choice, knowing patient situations, relying on expert knowledge, and interpersonal relationships. Results support the need for contextually-based nursing ethics education, focusing on identifying and resolving moral issues nurses encounter. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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