2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161082
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients' Concerns about Healthcare Safety
Abstract:
Patients' Concerns about Healthcare Safety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 14107 Independence Street, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-1657
Co-Authors:Wesley Richardson, MSN, RN, Predoctoral Student
The Institute of Medicine's report "To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System" brought patient safety to the forefront of the nation's attention. Although extensive research has begun to understand the magnitude of the problem, few researchers have examined patients' perceptions or concerns related to issues of patient safety. Experts have noted the lack of attention paid to the patient and concluded that patient safety models or frameworks will not be complete without the patient perspective (Vincent & Coulter, 2002). The purpose of this research was to examine specific concerns patients have about their safety during hospitalization. Qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews (n=42). Sample: Caucasian (51%), Latino (39%) and African-American (7%); average age: 47 (range: 16-90) with hospitalizations of at least 3 days. Analysis included qualitative content analysis with constant comparative analysis. Methodological rigor included data saturation, peer-debriefing and member-checking procedures. Findings: informants shared an interconnected web of general worries, specific concerns, and moderating influences. In the center of this web were worries about their medical condition. Safety concerns were clustered into specific areas: environment of the hospital (cleanliness, roommates, strangers, personal security, lack of privacy, falling); procedure issues (surgery, anesthesia, IVs); competency issues (staff, physicians); communication & continuity (with patients, between various physicians, physicians and nursing staff); medications & pain management (right medication, allergies, side effects, knowing what medications given); nursing staff (enough staff, response to calls, empathy) and their physicians (trust, time with physician). Moderating influences on these concerns were: presence of family members, presence of nurses, explanations & teaching, caring attitude & offering care; listening to the patient, and knowing people in the environment. These findings should help us address patients' concerns and include their voice in the research about patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients' Concerns about Healthcare Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161082-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patients' Concerns about Healthcare Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 14107 Independence Street, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-1657</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lconnelly@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wesley Richardson, MSN, RN, Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Institute of Medicine's report &quot;To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System&quot; brought patient safety to the forefront of the nation's attention. Although extensive research has begun to understand the magnitude of the problem, few researchers have examined patients' perceptions or concerns related to issues of patient safety. Experts have noted the lack of attention paid to the patient and concluded that patient safety models or frameworks will not be complete without the patient perspective (Vincent &amp; Coulter, 2002). The purpose of this research was to examine specific concerns patients have about their safety during hospitalization. Qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews (n=42). Sample: Caucasian (51%), Latino (39%) and African-American (7%); average age: 47 (range: 16-90) with hospitalizations of at least 3 days. Analysis included qualitative content analysis with constant comparative analysis. Methodological rigor included data saturation, peer-debriefing and member-checking procedures. Findings: informants shared an interconnected web of general worries, specific concerns, and moderating influences. In the center of this web were worries about their medical condition. Safety concerns were clustered into specific areas: environment of the hospital (cleanliness, roommates, strangers, personal security, lack of privacy, falling); procedure issues (surgery, anesthesia, IVs); competency issues (staff, physicians); communication &amp; continuity (with patients, between various physicians, physicians and nursing staff); medications &amp; pain management (right medication, allergies, side effects, knowing what medications given); nursing staff (enough staff, response to calls, empathy) and their physicians (trust, time with physician). Moderating influences on these concerns were: presence of family members, presence of nurses, explanations &amp; teaching, caring attitude &amp; offering care; listening to the patient, and knowing people in the environment. These findings should help us address patients' concerns and include their voice in the research about patient safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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