2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161083
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue, Sleep, and Self-rated Health in Parents of Twins
Abstract:
Fatigue, Sleep, and Self-rated Health in Parents of Twins
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Damato, Elizabeth, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-2597
Co-Authors:Marilyn S. Sommers, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research and Glenn Kent, MS, Predoctoral Student
PURPOSE: Parenting several small infants at once places parents at risk for sleep disturbances, fatigue, and poor health. This pilot study's purpose was to describe fatigue, selected characteristics of sleep, and self-rated health in first-time parents of twins during the care-taking transition and to evaluate feasibility of study design. FRAMEWORK: In Pugh and Milligan's (1993) Framework for the Study of Childbearing Fatigue, fatigue results from interactions between physiological, psychological, and situational factors, affecting performance. This study focused on situational factors of sleep, subsequent fatigue, and self-reported health to increase understanding of challenges confronting parents of twins. SAMPLE: Ten primiparous couples who delivered twins were recruited from two hospitals. METHODS: Home data collection occurred at 2-3 weeks postpartum using the Lee Fatigue Scale, wrist actigraphs, sleep diaries, and the General Health subscale (RAND 36 - item Health Survey 1.0). RESULTS: Significantly greater evening fatigue was reported by mothers (M=6.8, SD=0.98) and fathers (M=5.8, SD=1.1) compared to morning fatigue (M=4.0 mothers, M=4.8 fathers). Actigraphy analysis found mean maternal night sleep time of 370.1 minutes with 2.3 interruptions/night; mean night sleep time for fathers was similar (M=324.4 minutes) with an average of only one interruption per night. Maternal total daily sleep time (including naps) was 405.9 minutes (~6.8 hr, SD=49.7); fathers had fewer minutes of daily sleep (M=346.1 minutes - 5.8 hr, SD=56.4). Maternal self-rated health (M=71.0, SD=22.3) was similar to previous reports for childbearing women; fathers' health was similar (M=72.5, SD=14.4). CONCLUSION: Pilot data suggest that in the early postpartum weeks, mothers of twins obtain more minutes of sleep than fathers, but it is more disturbed, resulting in greater evening fatigue. Levels of fatigue were similar to previous reports from singleton parents. Additional evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of sleep restriction on parental long-term health and to develop nursing interventions that minimize sleep restriction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue, Sleep, and Self-rated Health in Parents of Twinsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161083-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue, Sleep, and Self-rated Health in Parents of Twins</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Damato, Elizabeth, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-2597</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">egd@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn S. Sommers, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research and Glenn Kent, MS, Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE: Parenting several small infants at once places parents at risk for sleep disturbances, fatigue, and poor health. This pilot study's purpose was to describe fatigue, selected characteristics of sleep, and self-rated health in first-time parents of twins during the care-taking transition and to evaluate feasibility of study design. FRAMEWORK: In Pugh and Milligan's (1993) Framework for the Study of Childbearing Fatigue, fatigue results from interactions between physiological, psychological, and situational factors, affecting performance. This study focused on situational factors of sleep, subsequent fatigue, and self-reported health to increase understanding of challenges confronting parents of twins. SAMPLE: Ten primiparous couples who delivered twins were recruited from two hospitals. METHODS: Home data collection occurred at 2-3 weeks postpartum using the Lee Fatigue Scale, wrist actigraphs, sleep diaries, and the General Health subscale (RAND 36 - item Health Survey 1.0). RESULTS: Significantly greater evening fatigue was reported by mothers (M=6.8, SD=0.98) and fathers (M=5.8, SD=1.1) compared to morning fatigue (M=4.0 mothers, M=4.8 fathers). Actigraphy analysis found mean maternal night sleep time of 370.1 minutes with 2.3 interruptions/night; mean night sleep time for fathers was similar (M=324.4 minutes) with an average of only one interruption per night. Maternal total daily sleep time (including naps) was 405.9 minutes (~6.8 hr, SD=49.7); fathers had fewer minutes of daily sleep (M=346.1 minutes - 5.8 hr, SD=56.4). Maternal self-rated health (M=71.0, SD=22.3) was similar to previous reports for childbearing women; fathers' health was similar (M=72.5, SD=14.4). CONCLUSION: Pilot data suggest that in the early postpartum weeks, mothers of twins obtain more minutes of sleep than fathers, but it is more disturbed, resulting in greater evening fatigue. Levels of fatigue were similar to previous reports from singleton parents. Additional evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of sleep restriction on parental long-term health and to develop nursing interventions that minimize sleep restriction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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