Enrollment and Attendance in Preventive Parenting Interventions: Why Parents Don't Come

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161089
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enrollment and Attendance in Preventive Parenting Interventions: Why Parents Don't Come
Abstract:
Enrollment and Attendance in Preventive Parenting Interventions: Why Parents Don't Come
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Garvey, Christine, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-942-6953
Parent training (PT) is a widely used strategy for increasing positive parenting behaviors and decreasing negative child behaviors. However, interventions cannot be effective if parents do not enroll and attend these programs. Research shows that enrollment and attendance rates are typically low in prevention interventions. These low rates can result in under represented samples that threaten study validity. The purpose of this study is to understand why parents do not enroll in or attend PT programs. A randomized controlled trial of an preventive PT program was conducted in 7 daycare centers serving low income families with 2-4 year old children (n = 292). The PT program, based on Patterson's Coercive Family Process Model, was offered in 11 weekly sessions at the children's day care center. Enrollment rates were estimated in the intervention and control centers. Non-enrolled parents were asked to complete an anonymous, 21-item survey of reasons they chose not to enroll. Attendance rates were calculated for the intervention centers. Parents who enrolled but did not attend one or more PT groups were interviewed to learn why they were unable to attend. Overall enrollment rate was 33.4%. Enrollment rates were higher in the control (39%) than in the intervention (29.6%) centers. The most common reasons for not enrolling in the study related to time constraints, not knowing about the study, and not wanting to be in a study. PT parents attended an average of 39% of sessions. Higher attendance was associated with lower parenting self-efficacy, more child behavior problems, and attending the first PT session. Results suggest that (a) parents are more likely to attend if they feel vulnerable as parents and (b) researchers must assess the effectiveness of their recruitment strategies and discover creative ways to provide preventive interventions so parents can and will attend.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnrollment and Attendance in Preventive Parenting Interventions: Why Parents Don't Comeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161089-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enrollment and Attendance in Preventive Parenting Interventions: Why Parents Don't Come</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garvey, Christine, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina - Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-942-6953</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Christine_A_Garvey@rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Parent training (PT) is a widely used strategy for increasing positive parenting behaviors and decreasing negative child behaviors. However, interventions cannot be effective if parents do not enroll and attend these programs. Research shows that enrollment and attendance rates are typically low in prevention interventions. These low rates can result in under represented samples that threaten study validity. The purpose of this study is to understand why parents do not enroll in or attend PT programs. A randomized controlled trial of an preventive PT program was conducted in 7 daycare centers serving low income families with 2-4 year old children (n = 292). The PT program, based on Patterson's Coercive Family Process Model, was offered in 11 weekly sessions at the children's day care center. Enrollment rates were estimated in the intervention and control centers. Non-enrolled parents were asked to complete an anonymous, 21-item survey of reasons they chose not to enroll. Attendance rates were calculated for the intervention centers. Parents who enrolled but did not attend one or more PT groups were interviewed to learn why they were unable to attend. Overall enrollment rate was 33.4%. Enrollment rates were higher in the control (39%) than in the intervention (29.6%) centers. The most common reasons for not enrolling in the study related to time constraints, not knowing about the study, and not wanting to be in a study. PT parents attended an average of 39% of sessions. Higher attendance was associated with lower parenting self-efficacy, more child behavior problems, and attending the first PT session. Results suggest that (a) parents are more likely to attend if they feel vulnerable as parents and (b) researchers must assess the effectiveness of their recruitment strategies and discover creative ways to provide preventive interventions so parents can and will attend.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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