2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161090
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supplementing Relaxation and Music for Postoperative Pain
Abstract:
Supplementing Relaxation and Music for Postoperative Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5975
Co-Authors:Jeffrey M. Albert, PhD, Assistant Professor; Gene C. Anderson, PhD, FAAN, Emeritus Professor; Stephen Wotman, DDS, Professor; and Xiaomei Cong, PhDc, RN, Project Director
Pain following major abdominal surgery continues to be excessive for many patients. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of two-day use of relaxation/music (RM), patient teaching about pain management (PT) and their combination (CB) on postoperative pain. An randomized 2X2 factorial design with 517 participants (18-75 yrs) assessed the overall RM and PT effects. Immediate effects of the taped interventions were measured with sensation and distress VAS before and after five 20-minutes tests. General effects were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, 4 pm and 8 pm each day. Comparisons using MANOVA showed that the relaxation/music-based groups (RM/CB), had significantly less immediate posttest pain than those who did not receive relaxation and music (PT/control) on day 1 morning, p<.001 and afternoon, p<.05 and on day 2 morning, p<.05. Although no significant immediate RM effects were found on the day of surgery and day 2 afternoon, significant effects on difference scores averaged across the five points were found. Results were supported by autonomic nervous system effects of significantly lower pulse/respiration rate in the RM/CB groups, day1 am, p<.05. There was no immediate PT effect in the patient-teaching-based groups (PT/CB) compared to those who did not receive teaching (RM/control). There were no RM or PT effects on general pain. Results support the use of adjuvant non-pharmacological methods in nursing practice as proposed in the Good and Moore theory and show that RM has immediate but not general effects on pain. More research is needed on the length of the effect after using RM and the kind and dose of patient teaching for pain management that is effective postoperatively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupplementing Relaxation and Music for Postoperative Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161090-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Supplementing Relaxation and Music for Postoperative Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Good, Marion, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpg@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeffrey M. Albert, PhD, Assistant Professor; Gene C. Anderson, PhD, FAAN, Emeritus Professor; Stephen Wotman, DDS, Professor; and Xiaomei Cong, PhDc, RN, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain following major abdominal surgery continues to be excessive for many patients. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of two-day use of relaxation/music (RM), patient teaching about pain management (PT) and their combination (CB) on postoperative pain. An randomized 2X2 factorial design with 517 participants (18-75 yrs) assessed the overall RM and PT effects. Immediate effects of the taped interventions were measured with sensation and distress VAS before and after five 20-minutes tests. General effects were measured at 8 am, 12 noon, 4 pm and 8 pm each day. Comparisons using MANOVA showed that the relaxation/music-based groups (RM/CB), had significantly less immediate posttest pain than those who did not receive relaxation and music (PT/control) on day 1 morning, p&lt;.001 and afternoon, p&lt;.05 and on day 2 morning, p&lt;.05. Although no significant immediate RM effects were found on the day of surgery and day 2 afternoon, significant effects on difference scores averaged across the five points were found. Results were supported by autonomic nervous system effects of significantly lower pulse/respiration rate in the RM/CB groups, day1 am, p&lt;.05. There was no immediate PT effect in the patient-teaching-based groups (PT/CB) compared to those who did not receive teaching (RM/control). There were no RM or PT effects on general pain. Results support the use of adjuvant non-pharmacological methods in nursing practice as proposed in the Good and Moore theory and show that RM has immediate but not general effects on pain. More research is needed on the length of the effect after using RM and the kind and dose of patient teaching for pain management that is effective postoperatively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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