An Individualized Representational Intervention for Elderly Women with Multiple Symptoms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161093
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Individualized Representational Intervention for Elderly Women with Multiple Symptoms
Abstract:
An Individualized Representational Intervention for Elderly Women with Multiple Symptoms
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Heidrich, Susan M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Professor
Contact Address:SON K6/362, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608 263-5191
Co-Authors: Sandra E. Ward, PhD, RN, FAAN and Roger Brown, PhD, Professor
Older women cope with a myriad of symptoms associated with numerous chronic illnesses and their treatment as well as age-related physical and psychological changes. For women with a history of breast cancer, there is an added burden of symptom related to late effects of cancer and its treatment. Symptoms have a major influence on quality of life in older women, but stereotypes about aging may create barriers to effective symptom management. A pilot randomized trial was conducted to examine the effects of a theory-based, individualized, representational, educational intervention (IRIS) on symptom distress and quality of life. IRIS is a counseling interview in which symptom representations are assessed, barriers based on misconceptions and stereotypes addressed, and symptom management strategies developed. Breast cancer survivors (n = 40, mean age = 72) were randomly assigned to IRIS or usual care control group. Symptom distress, barriers to symptom management, and quality of life were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks post intervention. Age-related barriers to symptom management were reported by 12% to 50% of women. Number of symptoms, symptom distress, and barriers were negatively correlated with quality of life measures. Women in the IRIS group identified a total of 33 target symptoms for intervention. Symptom distress for the primary target symptom significantly declined from baseline (M = 3.95 on a 1 û 5 scale) to six weeks (M = 2.38, p < .0001) and 10 weeks (M = 2.57, p < .001). Women in the intervention group engaged in significantly more symptom management behaviors. The initial findings demonstrate support for the utility of the representational approach and the efficacy of IRIS in improving symptom management in older women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Individualized Representational Intervention for Elderly Women with Multiple Symptomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161093-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Individualized Representational Intervention for Elderly Women with Multiple Symptoms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heidrich, Susan M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON K6/362, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608 263-5191</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smheidrich@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value"> Sandra E. Ward, PhD, RN, FAAN and Roger Brown, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Older women cope with a myriad of symptoms associated with numerous chronic illnesses and their treatment as well as age-related physical and psychological changes. For women with a history of breast cancer, there is an added burden of symptom related to late effects of cancer and its treatment. Symptoms have a major influence on quality of life in older women, but stereotypes about aging may create barriers to effective symptom management. A pilot randomized trial was conducted to examine the effects of a theory-based, individualized, representational, educational intervention (IRIS) on symptom distress and quality of life. IRIS is a counseling interview in which symptom representations are assessed, barriers based on misconceptions and stereotypes addressed, and symptom management strategies developed. Breast cancer survivors (n = 40, mean age = 72) were randomly assigned to IRIS or usual care control group. Symptom distress, barriers to symptom management, and quality of life were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 10 weeks post intervention. Age-related barriers to symptom management were reported by 12% to 50% of women. Number of symptoms, symptom distress, and barriers were negatively correlated with quality of life measures. Women in the IRIS group identified a total of 33 target symptoms for intervention. Symptom distress for the primary target symptom significantly declined from baseline (M = 3.95 on a 1 &ucirc; 5 scale) to six weeks (M = 2.38, p &lt; .0001) and 10 weeks (M = 2.57, p &lt; .001). Women in the intervention group engaged in significantly more symptom management behaviors. The initial findings demonstrate support for the utility of the representational approach and the efficacy of IRIS in improving symptom management in older women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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