Does Health Self Determinism and Self Efficacy Improve a Discharge Planning Screen for Persons with Heart Failure?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161094
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Health Self Determinism and Self Efficacy Improve a Discharge Planning Screen for Persons with Heart Failure?
Abstract:
Does Health Self Determinism and Self Efficacy Improve a Discharge Planning Screen for Persons with Heart Failure?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Holland, Diane, PhD(c), RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:SON Eisenberg SL-41, 201 West Center Street, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA
Contact Telephone:507-284-4354
Co-Authors:Kathleen E. Krichbaum, PhD, RN, Associate Professor and Sharon Tucker, DNSc, RN, CNS
Background: A screen was validated as predictive of the use of hospital specialized discharge planning services (HSDPS) in studies of hospitalized adults, but explained only 30% of the variance. Patient inability or reluctance to self-initiate plans to meet continuing healthcare needs was identified in the review of false negative screen scores. Health self-determinism and self-efficacy were believed to be variables that may capture this inability or reluctance, and therefore improve the screen performance. Objective: Examine whether the addition of health self-determinism and heart failure self-efficacy improve the performance of the screen in a population-based cohort of persons hospitalized with heart failure (HF). Methods: A prospective cohort study was designed and conducted from 2004 to 2005 at Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Adults with HF participated. The Health Self-Determinism Index (HSDI) and Self Efficacy in Heart Failure Scale (SEHFS), self-reported measures, were collected in addition to original screen variables (age, disability, living alone, self-reported walking limitation) from record reviews. The outcome was defined as a documented referral for HSDPS. Results: Of the 244 persons invited, 66 refused (27%), 175 enrolled, and 122 (70%) participated. No differences existed between participants and non-participants in age, length of HF history, New York Heart Association class, reason for hospital admission, co-morbidities, severity of illness, or length of stay. The screen predicted use of HSDPS (p < .001). The addition of the HSDI score did not improve the screens performance (p = .45), nor did the SEHFS (p = .11). Conclusion: The original screen variables held up in this HF sample, although much of the variance remains unexplained. Use of HSDPS represents nursing actions to improve health outcomes for patients with HF. Further exploration of personal variables that may improve the screen performance and are potentially amenable to nursing interventions is needed. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Health Self Determinism and Self Efficacy Improve a Discharge Planning Screen for Persons with Heart Failure?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161094-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Health Self Determinism and Self Efficacy Improve a Discharge Planning Screen for Persons with Heart Failure?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holland, Diane, PhD(c), RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON Eisenberg SL-41, 201 West Center Street, Rochester, MN, 55902, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-284-4354</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Holland.diane@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen E. Krichbaum, PhD, RN, Associate Professor and Sharon Tucker, DNSc, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: A screen was validated as predictive of the use of hospital specialized discharge planning services (HSDPS) in studies of hospitalized adults, but explained only 30% of the variance. Patient inability or reluctance to self-initiate plans to meet continuing healthcare needs was identified in the review of false negative screen scores. Health self-determinism and self-efficacy were believed to be variables that may capture this inability or reluctance, and therefore improve the screen performance. Objective: Examine whether the addition of health self-determinism and heart failure self-efficacy improve the performance of the screen in a population-based cohort of persons hospitalized with heart failure (HF). Methods: A prospective cohort study was designed and conducted from 2004 to 2005 at Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Adults with HF participated. The Health Self-Determinism Index (HSDI) and Self Efficacy in Heart Failure Scale (SEHFS), self-reported measures, were collected in addition to original screen variables (age, disability, living alone, self-reported walking limitation) from record reviews. The outcome was defined as a documented referral for HSDPS. Results: Of the 244 persons invited, 66 refused (27%), 175 enrolled, and 122 (70%) participated. No differences existed between participants and non-participants in age, length of HF history, New York Heart Association class, reason for hospital admission, co-morbidities, severity of illness, or length of stay. The screen predicted use of HSDPS (p &lt; .001). The addition of the HSDI score did not improve the screens performance (p = .45), nor did the SEHFS (p = .11). Conclusion: The original screen variables held up in this HF sample, although much of the variance remains unexplained. Use of HSDPS represents nursing actions to improve health outcomes for patients with HF. Further exploration of personal variables that may improve the screen performance and are potentially amenable to nursing interventions is needed. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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