Health Promotion Nursing Interventions with Vulnerable Populations in Community Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161095
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion Nursing Interventions with Vulnerable Populations in Community Settings
Abstract:
Health Promotion Nursing Interventions with Vulnerable Populations in Community Settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hong, Woi-Hyun, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:CON - Cunningham Hall, Rm 413, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-315-7944
Co-Authors:Sally P. Lundeen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean
Health promotion interventions for vulnerable population are complex and may require non- traditional health care delivery models. Health promotion is a process of enabling people to increase control over the determinants of health and therefore to improve their health (WHO, 1986). By tackling multiple health determinants and reducing obstacles, nurses can make a difference in the health and well-being of people (ICN, 2000). The Lundeen Community Nursing Center Model proposes a comprehensive approach to health care of vulnerable populations that integrates medical and nursing care with social services (Lundeen, 1993). The purpose of the study is to describe the health promotion interventions of nurses serving a low-income urban population in an academic community nursing center from January, 1988 through December 1998. The Omaha System was used to code client problems and nursing interventions for 9,839 visits. A dataset created by The Automated Community Health Information System (ACHIS), a computerized clinical information system, was analyzed. This retrospective descriptive design employed secondary data analysis to link nursing diagnoses to nursing interventions. A total of 9,836 interventions were analyzed. Each intervention was linked to a nursing diagnosis coded with modifiers as either actual or potential problems or health promotion issues. A total of 58,747 modifiers were documented for 58,747 nursing diagnoses. Although a majority of the nursing diagnoses (61.8%) were coded as actual problems as might be expected for this vulnerable population, 38% of the client problems were documented as either potential problems (20.6%) or health promotion issues (17.7%). Health Teaching, Guidance and Counseling (38.9%) and Case Management (25.8%) were the most frequently coded interventions. The relationships between health promotion diagnoses and nursing interventions will be explored. Preliminary analysis suggests that the community nursing center model has potential to facilitate the provision of complex health promotion interventions by nurses to vulnerable populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion Nursing Interventions with Vulnerable Populations in Community Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161095-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Promotion Nursing Interventions with Vulnerable Populations in Community Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hong, Woi-Hyun, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Cunningham Hall, Rm 413, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-315-7944</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wshong@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sally P. Lundeen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health promotion interventions for vulnerable population are complex and may require non- traditional health care delivery models. Health promotion is a process of enabling people to increase control over the determinants of health and therefore to improve their health (WHO, 1986). By tackling multiple health determinants and reducing obstacles, nurses can make a difference in the health and well-being of people (ICN, 2000). The Lundeen Community Nursing Center Model proposes a comprehensive approach to health care of vulnerable populations that integrates medical and nursing care with social services (Lundeen, 1993). The purpose of the study is to describe the health promotion interventions of nurses serving a low-income urban population in an academic community nursing center from January, 1988 through December 1998. The Omaha System was used to code client problems and nursing interventions for 9,839 visits. A dataset created by The Automated Community Health Information System (ACHIS), a computerized clinical information system, was analyzed. This retrospective descriptive design employed secondary data analysis to link nursing diagnoses to nursing interventions. A total of 9,836 interventions were analyzed. Each intervention was linked to a nursing diagnosis coded with modifiers as either actual or potential problems or health promotion issues. A total of 58,747 modifiers were documented for 58,747 nursing diagnoses. Although a majority of the nursing diagnoses (61.8%) were coded as actual problems as might be expected for this vulnerable population, 38% of the client problems were documented as either potential problems (20.6%) or health promotion issues (17.7%). Health Teaching, Guidance and Counseling (38.9%) and Case Management (25.8%) were the most frequently coded interventions. The relationships between health promotion diagnoses and nursing interventions will be explored. Preliminary analysis suggests that the community nursing center model has potential to facilitate the provision of complex health promotion interventions by nurses to vulnerable populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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