2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161102
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Walking for Healthy Hearts: Dog Walking Program
Abstract:
Walking for Healthy Hearts: Dog Walking Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Johnson, Rebecca, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, S413 Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:(573) 884-4686
Co-Authors:Richard L. Meadows, DVM, DABVP, Clinical Associate Professor and Charlotte McKenney, BSN, Research Assistant
Improving health in the economically disadvantaged is urgent because of their risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Healthy People 2010 identified walking as the number one leading health indicator; inactivity is linked to progression of devastating, costly illnesses. Walking helps minimize risk factors, prevents disability, maintains function, and reduces depression and anxiety. For public housing residents to benefit from an activity program, it must be inexpensive, accessible and innovative. Studies show benefits of human-animal interaction. Pet attachment is associated with lower systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, a healthy lifestyle including exercise, improved survival rate in heart disease patients, decreased depression and improved morale.

The study tested health effects of coupling certified dogs and a handler with public housing residents in a walking program. This presentation describes weight changes, and whether participants viewed the dogs as motivators for continued participation.

After informed consent, cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar levels were measured. Blood pressure, heart rate, weight, body mass index, bone density index, and joint mobility were recorded. Walks began at 10-minutes 3 times per week progressing to 20-minutes 5 days per week over either 26 or 50 weeks. Blood pressure and weight were recorded weekly. Participants' comments about the program and the dogs were recorded daily.

Thirteen participants in the 50-week group (6 males, 7 females) age 40-80 (mean=51) had a mean weight loss of 14.4 pounds (p=0.035). Thirteen participants in the 26-week group(6 males and 7 females) age 53-82 (mean=59) had a mean weight loss of 5 pounds (ns). Participants stated their relationship with the dogs inspired them "to get up in the morning" and to "be better people."

Weight loss surpassed that of national weight loss programs. Participants believed the dogs loved them unconditionally, and made walking pleasant. The protocol is inexpensive and minimally burdensome to participants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWalking for Healthy Hearts: Dog Walking Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161102-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Walking for Healthy Hearts: Dog Walking Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Rebecca, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, S413 Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(573) 884-4686</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rajohnson@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Richard L. Meadows, DVM, DABVP, Clinical Associate Professor and Charlotte McKenney, BSN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Improving health in the economically disadvantaged is urgent because of their risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Healthy People 2010 identified walking as the number one leading health indicator; inactivity is linked to progression of devastating, costly illnesses. Walking helps minimize risk factors, prevents disability, maintains function, and reduces depression and anxiety. For public housing residents to benefit from an activity program, it must be inexpensive, accessible and innovative. Studies show benefits of human-animal interaction. Pet attachment is associated with lower systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, a healthy lifestyle including exercise, improved survival rate in heart disease patients, decreased depression and improved morale.<br/><br/>The study tested health effects of coupling certified dogs and a handler with public housing residents in a walking program. This presentation describes weight changes, and whether participants viewed the dogs as motivators for continued participation.<br/><br/>After informed consent, cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar levels were measured. Blood pressure, heart rate, weight, body mass index, bone density index, and joint mobility were recorded. Walks began at 10-minutes 3 times per week progressing to 20-minutes 5 days per week over either 26 or 50 weeks. Blood pressure and weight were recorded weekly. Participants' comments about the program and the dogs were recorded daily.<br/><br/>Thirteen participants in the 50-week group (6 males, 7 females) age 40-80 (mean=51) had a mean weight loss of 14.4 pounds (p=0.035). Thirteen participants in the 26-week group(6 males and 7 females) age 53-82 (mean=59) had a mean weight loss of 5 pounds (ns). Participants stated their relationship with the dogs inspired them &quot;to get up in the morning&quot; and to &quot;be better people.&quot; <br/><br/>Weight loss surpassed that of national weight loss programs. Participants believed the dogs loved them unconditionally, and made walking pleasant. The protocol is inexpensive and minimally burdensome to participants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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