The Importance of Measuring Engagement in Preventive Interventions with Low Income Families of Color

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Importance of Measuring Engagement in Preventive Interventions with Low Income Families of Color
Abstract:
The Importance of Measuring Engagement in Preventive Interventions with Low Income Families of Color
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Julion, Wrenetha, DNSc, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON -Suite 1055B, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-942-6272
Attendance rates in preventive parent training (PT) programs tend to be less than 50% of intervention sessions. However, even when attendance rates can be raised, parents may not be actively engaged in the intervention, thus reducing intervention efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a measure of parent engagement in preventive PT. Engagement is defined as the degree to which parents actively participate in intervention group sessions. The PT program used in this study is based on the Coercive Family Process Model. Parents meet in groups to watch and discuss brief videotaped vignettes of parent-child models engaged in situations typical of young families. Group leaders facilitate discussions around select strategies known to promote positive child behavior. Parents (n = 86) of 2-4 year old children enrolled in day care centers serving low income families participated in this 11-week PT program. After the 11th session, Group Leaders assessed parents' level of engagement in the PT intervention using a 7-item questionnaire. Items measure the degree to which parents attended to the videotapes and group discussion, were supportive of one another, participated in discussions, self-disclosed, were not resistant to program strategies, and correctly applied program principles. Alpha reliability for the engagement scale was .87. Higher parent engagement scores were related to higher attendance (p = .001); and greater improvements in their child's behavior at home (p = .05) and in the classroom (p = .05); and decreases in parent depression (p = .04). None of these improvements were related to attendance rates. Group leaders expressed confidence in their abilities to rate engagement when parents attended more parent groups. Results suggest that engagement in the intervention was a better predictor of PT outcomes than attendance. This indicates that measuring engagement is an important component of understanding participation in preventive interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Importance of Measuring Engagement in Preventive Interventions with Low Income Families of Coloren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Importance of Measuring Engagement in Preventive Interventions with Low Income Families of Color</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Julion, Wrenetha, DNSc, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON -Suite 1055B, 600 S. Paulina, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-942-6272</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Wrenetha_A_Julion@rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Attendance rates in preventive parent training (PT) programs tend to be less than 50% of intervention sessions. However, even when attendance rates can be raised, parents may not be actively engaged in the intervention, thus reducing intervention efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a measure of parent engagement in preventive PT. Engagement is defined as the degree to which parents actively participate in intervention group sessions. The PT program used in this study is based on the Coercive Family Process Model. Parents meet in groups to watch and discuss brief videotaped vignettes of parent-child models engaged in situations typical of young families. Group leaders facilitate discussions around select strategies known to promote positive child behavior. Parents (n = 86) of 2-4 year old children enrolled in day care centers serving low income families participated in this 11-week PT program. After the 11th session, Group Leaders assessed parents' level of engagement in the PT intervention using a 7-item questionnaire. Items measure the degree to which parents attended to the videotapes and group discussion, were supportive of one another, participated in discussions, self-disclosed, were not resistant to program strategies, and correctly applied program principles. Alpha reliability for the engagement scale was .87. Higher parent engagement scores were related to higher attendance (p = .001); and greater improvements in their child's behavior at home (p = .05) and in the classroom (p = .05); and decreases in parent depression (p = .04). None of these improvements were related to attendance rates. Group leaders expressed confidence in their abilities to rate engagement when parents attended more parent groups. Results suggest that engagement in the intervention was a better predictor of PT outcomes than attendance. This indicates that measuring engagement is an important component of understanding participation in preventive interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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