Comparing the Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Data Set and Primary Care Provider Diagnosis for Depression in Rural Nursing Home Residents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161104
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing the Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Data Set and Primary Care Provider Diagnosis for Depression in Rural Nursing Home Residents
Abstract:
Comparing the Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Data Set and Primary Care Provider Diagnosis for Depression in Rural Nursing Home Residents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kerber, Cindy, PhD, APN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois Wesleyan University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 406 N Linden, Bloomington, IL, 61701, USA
Contact Telephone:309-310-1841
Co-Authors:Mary J. Dyck, PhD, MSN, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; Ken Culp, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Kathleen Buckwalter, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Depression negatively impacts quality of life. Reports on quality of care in nursing homes (NHs) identified under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression as a major problem. Subsequent reports noted improvement in that 25% of all NS residents were receiving antidepressants. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression in rural Iowa NHs based on data from the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Minimum Data Set (MDS), and Primary-Care Provider (PCP) depression diagnosis, and to explore gender differences in prevalence and methods of detection. This secondary analysis collected data from 279 randomly selected residents of NHs in rural Iowa. The prevalence of depression based on the GDS (score of >6) was 37.3%, the MDS was 21.3% and the PCP depression diagnosis was 39.1%. Women were more frequently diagnosed by their PCP with 40% receiving a depression diagnosis. The GDS indicated 35% of women were depressed and 22% were identified as depressed by the MDS. In contrast, men were more commonly identified as depressed using the GDS (45%), whereas 34% were identified as depressed by their PCP and 19% with the MDS. A Kappa value indicated only chance level of agreement between the MDS, GDS, and PCP in identifying depression in NH residents. When all three methods were combined 67.1% of NH residents were identified as depressed. Men demonstrated slightly higher levels of depression (68.3% than women (66.8%). Detection of depression among NH residents continues to be problematic. Since the GDS is reliable and valid, we recommend adding it to the MDS for cognitively intact residents to detect depression more accurately. Since older men were more often identified as depressed by the GDS, this recommendation could improve detection of depression in male residents who are at greatest risk for suicide.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing the Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Data Set and Primary Care Provider Diagnosis for Depression in Rural Nursing Home Residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161104-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing the Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Data Set and Primary Care Provider Diagnosis for Depression in Rural Nursing Home Residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerber, Cindy, PhD, APN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois Wesleyan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 406 N Linden, Bloomington, IL, 61701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-310-1841</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ckerber@iwu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary J. Dyck, PhD, MSN, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; Ken Culp, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Kathleen Buckwalter, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression negatively impacts quality of life. Reports on quality of care in nursing homes (NHs) identified under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression as a major problem. Subsequent reports noted improvement in that 25% of all NS residents were receiving antidepressants. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression in rural Iowa NHs based on data from the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Minimum Data Set (MDS), and Primary-Care Provider (PCP) depression diagnosis, and to explore gender differences in prevalence and methods of detection. This secondary analysis collected data from 279 randomly selected residents of NHs in rural Iowa. The prevalence of depression based on the GDS (score of &gt;6) was 37.3%, the MDS was 21.3% and the PCP depression diagnosis was 39.1%. Women were more frequently diagnosed by their PCP with 40% receiving a depression diagnosis. The GDS indicated 35% of women were depressed and 22% were identified as depressed by the MDS. In contrast, men were more commonly identified as depressed using the GDS (45%), whereas 34% were identified as depressed by their PCP and 19% with the MDS. A Kappa value indicated only chance level of agreement between the MDS, GDS, and PCP in identifying depression in NH residents. When all three methods were combined 67.1% of NH residents were identified as depressed. Men demonstrated slightly higher levels of depression (68.3% than women (66.8%). Detection of depression among NH residents continues to be problematic. Since the GDS is reliable and valid, we recommend adding it to the MDS for cognitively intact residents to detect depression more accurately. Since older men were more often identified as depressed by the GDS, this recommendation could improve detection of depression in male residents who are at greatest risk for suicide.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:15:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:15:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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