2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161112
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Low Dose Lipopolysaccharide
Abstract:
Effects of Low Dose Lipopolysaccharide
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kupferschmid, Barbara, PhD(c), MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan - SON
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:2060 SNB 0482, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-769-3311
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor
Research has shown that in the presence of behaviors, such as decreased weight, animals may also display other behaviors such as decreased motor activity or social exploration. These behaviors, collectively termed sickness behaviors, have generally occurred in a dose related manner after the administration of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, the dose related effects of LPS on spatial learning have not been fully investigated. In this preliminary pilot study we examined the effect of low doses of LPS on spatial learning, weight, and food intake. Adult (5-6 months) and old (22 months) male Brown-Norway rats were randomly assigned to either control or experimental groups. Animals received intraperitoneal injections of either 50 or 100 ¦g/kg LPS or saline 3 hours after lights off. Testing was conducted in the Morris-water maze one hour after injections with young animals and five hours with old animals. There were four trials per day for five days. The latency in seconds and the directional heading error (DHE) to reach a hidden platform were recorded for each trial. Swim time and DHE were averaged by day. There was not a significant difference in weight loss or food intake during the first 24 hours post injections between the control and experimental animals in either age group. However, there was a significant difference in directional heading error means (Lambda(4,16)=9.087, p=.000) and in swim time latency (F(4,92)=22.66, p<.0001) between the days across the groups. The performance of the old experimental group was worst over days 2 and 3 displaying higher DHE and swim time means than the old control group. These preliminary results suggest that spatial learning may be affected in old animals even in the absence of other sickness behaviors such as weight loss or decreased food intake. Supported by: NIH, NINR, Institutional NRSA, T32 NR07074 [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Low Dose Lipopolysaccharideen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161112-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Low Dose Lipopolysaccharide</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kupferschmid, Barbara, PhD(c), MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan - SON</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2060 SNB 0482, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-769-3311</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bkupf@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research has shown that in the presence of behaviors, such as decreased weight, animals may also display other behaviors such as decreased motor activity or social exploration. These behaviors, collectively termed sickness behaviors, have generally occurred in a dose related manner after the administration of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, the dose related effects of LPS on spatial learning have not been fully investigated. In this preliminary pilot study we examined the effect of low doses of LPS on spatial learning, weight, and food intake. Adult (5-6 months) and old (22 months) male Brown-Norway rats were randomly assigned to either control or experimental groups. Animals received intraperitoneal injections of either 50 or 100 &brvbar;g/kg LPS or saline 3 hours after lights off. Testing was conducted in the Morris-water maze one hour after injections with young animals and five hours with old animals. There were four trials per day for five days. The latency in seconds and the directional heading error (DHE) to reach a hidden platform were recorded for each trial. Swim time and DHE were averaged by day. There was not a significant difference in weight loss or food intake during the first 24 hours post injections between the control and experimental animals in either age group. However, there was a significant difference in directional heading error means (Lambda(4,16)=9.087, p=.000) and in swim time latency (F(4,92)=22.66, p&lt;.0001) between the days across the groups. The performance of the old experimental group was worst over days 2 and 3 displaying higher DHE and swim time means than the old control group. These preliminary results suggest that spatial learning may be affected in old animals even in the absence of other sickness behaviors such as weight loss or decreased food intake. Supported by: NIH, NINR, Institutional NRSA, T32 NR07074 [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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