2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161113
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults and Falls: Use of Home Safety Checklists
Abstract:
Older Adults and Falls: Use of Home Safety Checklists
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lach, Helen, PhD, RN, GCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, Saint Louis, MO, 63119, USA
Contact Telephone:(314)977-8939
Falls are common among community-dwelling older with about 30% experiencing a fall each year. A common recommendation is for older adults to use home safety checklists. Many versions of these checklists are available from government agencies such as the CDC, the National Patient Safety Council, as well as many community organizations. However, little is known about the use of these checklists. Do older adult use them? If they use them, do they make any changes? This study explores the use of home safety checklists among older adults in a senior education program who were participating in a longitudinal study of health and activity participation in 2000. About half of the survey subjects were actively participating in health education classes. Subjects had a mean age of 76.7 + 6.2; 82.5% were female, 97% were White, and 39% were married, 72.2% had greater than a high school education. Of the sample, 16.7% reported falling once in the past year and 8.2% fell two or more times. Regarding home safety checklists, 50.3% reported that they had never seen one, 18.9% had seen or been given one, and 30.8% reported having used one to identify hazards in their home. Overall, 20.8% of participants reported making changes in the past year to prevent falls. Fisher's exact test indicated that those who used a home safety checklist were more likely to have made changes than those who had no checklist (p=.0001). The findings suggest that home safety checklists may be helpful, but although they seem common, they are not reaching many older adults, even those who are well-educated and actively engaged in learning activities. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults and Falls: Use of Home Safety Checklistsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161113-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults and Falls: Use of Home Safety Checklists</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lach, Helen, PhD, RN, GCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, Saint Louis, MO, 63119, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(314)977-8939</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lachh@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Falls are common among community-dwelling older with about 30% experiencing a fall each year. A common recommendation is for older adults to use home safety checklists. Many versions of these checklists are available from government agencies such as the CDC, the National Patient Safety Council, as well as many community organizations. However, little is known about the use of these checklists. Do older adult use them? If they use them, do they make any changes? This study explores the use of home safety checklists among older adults in a senior education program who were participating in a longitudinal study of health and activity participation in 2000. About half of the survey subjects were actively participating in health education classes. Subjects had a mean age of 76.7 + 6.2; 82.5% were female, 97% were White, and 39% were married, 72.2% had greater than a high school education. Of the sample, 16.7% reported falling once in the past year and 8.2% fell two or more times. Regarding home safety checklists, 50.3% reported that they had never seen one, 18.9% had seen or been given one, and 30.8% reported having used one to identify hazards in their home. Overall, 20.8% of participants reported making changes in the past year to prevent falls. Fisher's exact test indicated that those who used a home safety checklist were more likely to have made changes than those who had no checklist (p=.0001). The findings suggest that home safety checklists may be helpful, but although they seem common, they are not reaching many older adults, even those who are well-educated and actively engaged in learning activities. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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