Blood Pressure Levels and Nocturnal Decline in Lung Transplant Candidates Awaiting Donor Organs: A Longitudinal Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161114
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blood Pressure Levels and Nocturnal Decline in Lung Transplant Candidates Awaiting Donor Organs: A Longitudinal Study
Abstract:
Blood Pressure Levels and Nocturnal Decline in Lung Transplant Candidates Awaiting Donor Organs: A Longitudinal Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lanuza, Dorothy, PhD, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, CSC K6/328, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:(608) 265-3246
Co-Authors:Cheryl A. Lefaiver, MSN, RN, Project Coordinator; Sangeeta Bhorade, MD; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor; Yvette Egan, BSN, Research Assistant; and Britt Wanta, BSN, Research Assistant
Systemic hypertension and loss of blood pressure (BP) nocturnal decline (ND) have been widely reported following solid organ transplantation. Yet, there are no prospective reports on BP patterns prior to transplant. The purpose of this study was to examine the BP patterns of lung transplant candidates who were waiting for donor organs. The Roy Adaptation Model guided this study. The sample consisted of 133 lung transplant candidates who wore ambulatory BP monitoring devices (Model 90202; Spacelabs Inc, Redmond, WA) for approximately 48 hours every 3 months. Data were analyzed longitudinally using a General Linear Mixed Model and GEE Model. Results showed: 1) no significant (NS) changes in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP over time; 2) a significant difference (p<0.05) between mean day and mean night SBP and DBP levels (see Table 1); 3) although all patients were normotensive, approximately 50% of the subjects lacked a ND (i.e., +/- 10% decline from day to night values); 4) NS trend was found overtime in the proportion of patients with ND; and 5) covariates of age, gender, and respiratory diagnosis alone or in combination had NS impact on the proportion of patients with/without ND. In summary, since pre transplant BP measurements were stable over time, these data provide a baseline for comparison with post lung transplant data. The findings make it possible to ascertain if subjects lacking a ND pre transplant are at greater risk for post transplant hypertension. Table 1. Differences Between Day SBP and Night SBP (Note: table presented in a different format for this posting) -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Month 1: (N=153); Month 3: (N=73); Month 6: (N=36);--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SBP Day----------- 123.31* ------------- 123.85*------------- 124.06 * ----------------------------------------Mean +/-SD ------ +/-10.58 ------------+/-12.76 ------------ +/-3.71------------------------------------------SBP Night--------- 111.69 -------------- 110.91---------------- 109.93* ----------------------------------------Mean +/- SD------ +/-11.41 ------------+/-10.67 -------------+/-0.29 -----------------------------------------*P <0.05
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlood Pressure Levels and Nocturnal Decline in Lung Transplant Candidates Awaiting Donor Organs: A Longitudinal Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161114-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Blood Pressure Levels and Nocturnal Decline in Lung Transplant Candidates Awaiting Donor Organs: A Longitudinal Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lanuza, Dorothy, PhD, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, CSC K6/328, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(608) 265-3246</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dlanuza@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl A. Lefaiver, MSN, RN, Project Coordinator; Sangeeta Bhorade, MD; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor; Yvette Egan, BSN, Research Assistant; and Britt Wanta, BSN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Systemic hypertension and loss of blood pressure (BP) nocturnal decline (ND) have been widely reported following solid organ transplantation. Yet, there are no prospective reports on BP patterns prior to transplant. The purpose of this study was to examine the BP patterns of lung transplant candidates who were waiting for donor organs. The Roy Adaptation Model guided this study. The sample consisted of 133 lung transplant candidates who wore ambulatory BP monitoring devices (Model 90202; Spacelabs Inc, Redmond, WA) for approximately 48 hours every 3 months. Data were analyzed longitudinally using a General Linear Mixed Model and GEE Model. Results showed: 1) no significant (NS) changes in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP over time; 2) a significant difference (p&lt;0.05) between mean day and mean night SBP and DBP levels (see Table 1); 3) although all patients were normotensive, approximately 50% of the subjects lacked a ND (i.e., +/- 10% decline from day to night values); 4) NS trend was found overtime in the proportion of patients with ND; and 5) covariates of age, gender, and respiratory diagnosis alone or in combination had NS impact on the proportion of patients with/without ND. In summary, since pre transplant BP measurements were stable over time, these data provide a baseline for comparison with post lung transplant data. The findings make it possible to ascertain if subjects lacking a ND pre transplant are at greater risk for post transplant hypertension. Table 1. Differences Between Day SBP and Night SBP (Note: table presented in a different format for this posting) -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Month 1: (N=153); Month 3: (N=73); Month 6: (N=36);--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SBP Day----------- 123.31* ------------- 123.85*------------- 124.06 * ----------------------------------------Mean +/-SD ------ +/-10.58 ------------+/-12.76 ------------ +/-3.71------------------------------------------SBP Night--------- 111.69 -------------- 110.91---------------- 109.93* ----------------------------------------Mean +/- SD------ +/-11.41 ------------+/-10.67 -------------+/-0.29 -----------------------------------------*P &lt;0.05</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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