2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Difference and HIV/AIDS Prevention Among Adolescents
Abstract:
Gender Difference and HIV/AIDS Prevention Among Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN - Study Contact and Co-Principal
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University-Miami Valley
Title:Co-Principal Investigator
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:973-427-0519
Co-Authors:Ali Salman, ND, PhD(c), RN, Principal Investigator and Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, MBA, FAAN, Professor
Background: An increasing need for reduction of HIV/AIDS related risky sexual behavior among youth has been highlighted. Studies indicated that self-efficacy plays an essential role in the prevention of adolescent's AIDS related risky sexual behavior. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory proposed that people with higher self-efficacy are less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior. However, how adolescents with different gender perform self-efficacy and risky sexual behavior has not been specifically addressed in detail. Purpose: This cross-sectional descriptive comparative study was designed to describe and examine gender differences in adolescents' self-efficacy and risky sexual behavior. Method: One hundred and sixty-nine (girls=90, boy=79) Taiwanese high school students who were 16-18 year-old and had sexual intercourse experience completed several reliable and valid questionnaires. Results: Female adolescents had significantly higher self-efficacy in refusing sexual intercourse, condom use, and questioning potential sexual partners than the males had. Male students had higher self-efficacy in "walk into a store and buy condoms" than the females. Female adolescents significantly practiced less risky sexual behavior in term of "not refusing unsafe sexual partner" and "not being alert to behavior with potential risk" than the males did. Thirty-eight percent of males versus 18.9 % of females engaged in sexual intercourse on a first date. Compared with female adolescents, less male adolescents (42.2% vs. 8.9%) always abstained from sexual intercourse when the partner's sexual history was unknown. Conclusion: Gender specific approach is needed while providing HIV/AIDS prevention programs to adolescents. Healthcare providers may use the information provided in this study to develop different focused intervention for male and female adolescents to reduce their sexual risks of HIV/AIDS infections.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Difference and HIV/AIDS Prevention Among Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161115-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Difference and HIV/AIDS Prevention Among Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Yi-Hui, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN - Study Contact and Co-Principal</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University-Miami Valley</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Co-Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">973-427-0519</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yi-hui.lee@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ali Salman, ND, PhD(c), RN, Principal Investigator and Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, MBA, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: An increasing need for reduction of HIV/AIDS related risky sexual behavior among youth has been highlighted. Studies indicated that self-efficacy plays an essential role in the prevention of adolescent's AIDS related risky sexual behavior. Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory proposed that people with higher self-efficacy are less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior. However, how adolescents with different gender perform self-efficacy and risky sexual behavior has not been specifically addressed in detail. Purpose: This cross-sectional descriptive comparative study was designed to describe and examine gender differences in adolescents' self-efficacy and risky sexual behavior. Method: One hundred and sixty-nine (girls=90, boy=79) Taiwanese high school students who were 16-18 year-old and had sexual intercourse experience completed several reliable and valid questionnaires. Results: Female adolescents had significantly higher self-efficacy in refusing sexual intercourse, condom use, and questioning potential sexual partners than the males had. Male students had higher self-efficacy in &quot;walk into a store and buy condoms&quot; than the females. Female adolescents significantly practiced less risky sexual behavior in term of &quot;not refusing unsafe sexual partner&quot; and &quot;not being alert to behavior with potential risk&quot; than the males did. Thirty-eight percent of males versus 18.9 % of females engaged in sexual intercourse on a first date. Compared with female adolescents, less male adolescents (42.2% vs. 8.9%) always abstained from sexual intercourse when the partner's sexual history was unknown. Conclusion: Gender specific approach is needed while providing HIV/AIDS prevention programs to adolescents. Healthcare providers may use the information provided in this study to develop different focused intervention for male and female adolescents to reduce their sexual risks of HIV/AIDS infections.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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