The Impact of Worry on Cognitive Representations of Illness in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161116
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Worry on Cognitive Representations of Illness in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer
Abstract:
The Impact of Worry on Cognitive Representations of Illness in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lehto, Rebecca, PhD, RN, OCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2380 Fuller Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
Contact Telephone:734-665-0796
Purpose: Worry, a cognitive process driven by anxiety and fears, is common among newly diagnosed cancer patients, but little research has explored how worry influences early illness perceptions. Cognitive representations are learned knowledge structures that guide thoughts, behaviors, and influence illness adaptation. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between worry and dimensions of cognitive representations of illness over time among individuals with suspected lung cancer. Theoretical Framework: A framework of person-environment compatibility from a cognitive map perspective was used. Subjects: Forty-two volunteers with suspected lung cancer were assessed following diagnosis, and again three weeks following surgery. Method: Worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire, 3CM ratings), cognitive representation [Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, Conceptual Cognitive Map(3CM)] measures, and measures of state-trait anxiety, illness experience, cognitive functioning, social support, and optimism were used. Content analysis, descriptives, correlations, repeated measures ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses were employed to assess worry, cognitive representations, changes in worry and cognitive representations over time, and relationships between worry, illness representations, and covariates. Results: Higher worry was significantly(p<. 05) correlated with negative dimensions of illness representations with relationships stronger over time. High worriers reported more symptoms and emotional distress before surgery, and lower perceived personal control and illness coherence than low worriers over time. High worriers reported negative perceptions of treatment effectiveness that increased over time. State anxiety significantly(p<. 05) predicted cancer-related worry when controlling covariates. State anxiety, unsatisfying illness experiences, lower optimism, and ineffective cognitive functioning predicted negative dimensions of cognitive representations of illness. Conclusions: Intense frequent worry appears to influence illness representations in important ways before treatment initiation. Negative changes in cognitive representations of illness could have detrimental effects on long term adaptation. Targeted interventions are recommended for individuals with lung cancer who are experiencing increased frequent worry before treatment. Supported by NINR, 1 F31 NR07695-01A1.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Worry on Cognitive Representations of Illness in Patients with Suspected Lung Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161116-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Worry on Cognitive Representations of Illness in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lehto, Rebecca, PhD, RN, OCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2380 Fuller Court, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-665-0796</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rhlehto@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Worry, a cognitive process driven by anxiety and fears, is common among newly diagnosed cancer patients, but little research has explored how worry influences early illness perceptions. Cognitive representations are learned knowledge structures that guide thoughts, behaviors, and influence illness adaptation. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between worry and dimensions of cognitive representations of illness over time among individuals with suspected lung cancer. Theoretical Framework: A framework of person-environment compatibility from a cognitive map perspective was used. Subjects: Forty-two volunteers with suspected lung cancer were assessed following diagnosis, and again three weeks following surgery. Method: Worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire, 3CM ratings), cognitive representation [Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, Conceptual Cognitive Map(3CM)] measures, and measures of state-trait anxiety, illness experience, cognitive functioning, social support, and optimism were used. Content analysis, descriptives, correlations, repeated measures ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses were employed to assess worry, cognitive representations, changes in worry and cognitive representations over time, and relationships between worry, illness representations, and covariates. Results: Higher worry was significantly(p&lt;. 05) correlated with negative dimensions of illness representations with relationships stronger over time. High worriers reported more symptoms and emotional distress before surgery, and lower perceived personal control and illness coherence than low worriers over time. High worriers reported negative perceptions of treatment effectiveness that increased over time. State anxiety significantly(p&lt;. 05) predicted cancer-related worry when controlling covariates. State anxiety, unsatisfying illness experiences, lower optimism, and ineffective cognitive functioning predicted negative dimensions of cognitive representations of illness. Conclusions: Intense frequent worry appears to influence illness representations in important ways before treatment initiation. Negative changes in cognitive representations of illness could have detrimental effects on long term adaptation. Targeted interventions are recommended for individuals with lung cancer who are experiencing increased frequent worry before treatment. Supported by NINR, 1 F31 NR07695-01A1.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.