2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161118
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New Graduate Nurses' Perception of Preparedness for Practice
Abstract:
New Graduate Nurses' Perception of Preparedness for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Li, Suling, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:National Council of State Boards of Nursing
Title:Associate Director
Contact Address:Research, 111 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3125253658
Co-Authors:Nancy Spector, DNSc, Director; Richard Smiley, MS; and Kevin Kenward, PhD, Director
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between new graduate nurses' perception of preparedness for practice and actual practice outcomes. A total of 7,497 new graduate RNs (76.5%) and LPNs (23.5%) were asked if the clinical and classroom components of their nursing education program had adequately prepared them to perform specified practice setting nursing functions (response rate=45.4%). The outcomes explored were involvement in errors (either by making errors themselves or being involved in the errors made by others) and perception of the difficulty of client assignments. The majority of the nurses reported that their education had adequately prepared them to perform some but not all essential areas of the nursing functions examined. Nearly 20% of the RNs and 18% of the LPNs reported difficulty with their patient care assignments. About half (50.2%) of the RNs and 38.8% of the LPNs reported that they have been involved in errors. Using logistic regression we identified that inadequate preparation of several nursing functions are predictive of difficulty with patient care assignments. These areas include working effectively within the health care team, administering medications to groups of patients, analyzing multiple types of data when making client-related decisions, delegating tasks to others, and understanding the pathophysiology underlying a client's conditions. In addition inadequate preparation of several nursing functions leads to higher probability of being involved in errors. These nursing functions include working effectively within the health care team, administering medications to groups of patients, knowing when and how to call a physician, recognizing the desired actions, side effects and interactions of medications, meeting clients' emotional /psychological needs, and supervising care provided by others. These findings have important implications for nursing education and practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew Graduate Nurses' Perception of Preparedness for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161118-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">New Graduate Nurses' Perception of Preparedness for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Li, Suling, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">National Council of State Boards of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Research, 111 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3125253658</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sli@ncsbn.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Spector, DNSc, Director; Richard Smiley, MS; and Kevin Kenward, PhD, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between new graduate nurses' perception of preparedness for practice and actual practice outcomes. A total of 7,497 new graduate RNs (76.5%) and LPNs (23.5%) were asked if the clinical and classroom components of their nursing education program had adequately prepared them to perform specified practice setting nursing functions (response rate=45.4%). The outcomes explored were involvement in errors (either by making errors themselves or being involved in the errors made by others) and perception of the difficulty of client assignments. The majority of the nurses reported that their education had adequately prepared them to perform some but not all essential areas of the nursing functions examined. Nearly 20% of the RNs and 18% of the LPNs reported difficulty with their patient care assignments. About half (50.2%) of the RNs and 38.8% of the LPNs reported that they have been involved in errors. Using logistic regression we identified that inadequate preparation of several nursing functions are predictive of difficulty with patient care assignments. These areas include working effectively within the health care team, administering medications to groups of patients, analyzing multiple types of data when making client-related decisions, delegating tasks to others, and understanding the pathophysiology underlying a client's conditions. In addition inadequate preparation of several nursing functions leads to higher probability of being involved in errors. These nursing functions include working effectively within the health care team, administering medications to groups of patients, knowing when and how to call a physician, recognizing the desired actions, side effects and interactions of medications, meeting clients' emotional /psychological needs, and supervising care provided by others. These findings have important implications for nursing education and practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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