Comprehensive measurement of social support and symptoms of depression in female adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161119
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comprehensive measurement of social support and symptoms of depression in female adolescents
Abstract:
Comprehensive measurement of social support and symptoms of depression in female adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Logsdon, M. Cynthia, DNS, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 555 S. Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40059, USA
Contact Telephone:502-852-5633
Co-Authors:Melissa Pinto-Foltz, BSN, RN; Craig Ziegler, MS, Research Analyst; and Paige Hertweck, MD, Associate Professor
The world of the low-income, female adolescent is complex and includes numerous spheres of influence. Our earlier, qualitative work indicated that low-income childbearing adolescents were frequently exposed to social toxins such as violence and drugs. Symptoms of depression were prevalent and frequently had a negative impact upon functioning. Our quantitative work has shown that childbearing adolescents perceive inadequate social support. However, the samples were recruited from a school program for childbearing adolescents and may not represent the wider population, there was not a comparison group of nonchildbearing adolescents, and social support was narrowly defined. This study corrects those gaps. In this cross-sectional study, guided by the Bioecological Framework of Development, we considered a comprehensive view of social support (Macrosystem, Mesosystem, and Microsystem) and any impact support variables had upon symptoms of depression in both childbearing (n=100) and nonchildbearing (n=100) samples of female adolescents. Participants were recruited from a variety of community health care and school facilities. After obtaining informed consent of the participants (13-18 years of age) and their parent/guardian (IRB approved), data was collected by a nurse at a home visit. Instruments included The Survey of Exposure to Community Violence (Richters & Martinez, 1993), Rosenberg's Self Esteem Tool (Rosenberg, 1965), Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al, 1983), The Social Network Index (Cohen et al, 1997), the CES-D depression instrument (Radloff, 1977), and demographic measures. Data collection is ongoing, and data analysis will include descriptive statistics, analysis of covariance, and model testing. The results of the study will be used to guide decisions on the conceptualization of social support and how it is measured in further studies of female adolescents. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComprehensive measurement of social support and symptoms of depression in female adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161119-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comprehensive measurement of social support and symptoms of depression in female adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Logsdon, M. Cynthia, DNS, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 555 S. Floyd Street, Louisville, KY, 40059, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502-852-5633</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mclogs01@gwise.louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melissa Pinto-Foltz, BSN, RN; Craig Ziegler, MS, Research Analyst; and Paige Hertweck, MD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The world of the low-income, female adolescent is complex and includes numerous spheres of influence. Our earlier, qualitative work indicated that low-income childbearing adolescents were frequently exposed to social toxins such as violence and drugs. Symptoms of depression were prevalent and frequently had a negative impact upon functioning. Our quantitative work has shown that childbearing adolescents perceive inadequate social support. However, the samples were recruited from a school program for childbearing adolescents and may not represent the wider population, there was not a comparison group of nonchildbearing adolescents, and social support was narrowly defined. This study corrects those gaps. In this cross-sectional study, guided by the Bioecological Framework of Development, we considered a comprehensive view of social support (Macrosystem, Mesosystem, and Microsystem) and any impact support variables had upon symptoms of depression in both childbearing (n=100) and nonchildbearing (n=100) samples of female adolescents. Participants were recruited from a variety of community health care and school facilities. After obtaining informed consent of the participants (13-18 years of age) and their parent/guardian (IRB approved), data was collected by a nurse at a home visit. Instruments included The Survey of Exposure to Community Violence (Richters &amp; Martinez, 1993), Rosenberg's Self Esteem Tool (Rosenberg, 1965), Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al, 1983), The Social Network Index (Cohen et al, 1997), the CES-D depression instrument (Radloff, 1977), and demographic measures. Data collection is ongoing, and data analysis will include descriptive statistics, analysis of covariance, and model testing. The results of the study will be used to guide decisions on the conceptualization of social support and how it is measured in further studies of female adolescents. [Poster Presentation]<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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