2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161122
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Nursing Worklife Model: Extending and Refining a New Theory
Abstract:
The Nursing Worklife Model: Extending and Refining a New Theory
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 4306, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-936-3055
Co-Authors:Heather K. Laschinger, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research
Purpose: The twofold purpose of this secondary data analysis was to test an emerging theoretical framework on a sample of American nurses, and to revise the theory to include variables other than those originally posited. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The Nursing Worklife Model (Leiter & Laschinger, 2005) describes mechanisms through which five practice domains in the hospital environment influence nurses' worklives to affect burnout. Empirical evidence links empowerment and job satisfaction to these same five domains, so we tested an alternate model demonstrating structural empowerment's relationship to five practice domains and ultimately to nurses' job satisfaction. The original model was tested on two large samples of Canadian nurses, who work in a very different environment than American nurses. Subjects/Method: The original study used a non-experimental design to randomly survey 500 hospital nurses throughout Michigan (66% response rate). The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index measured five practice domains, the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II measured empowerment, and the Index of Work Satisfaction measured job satisfaction. In this secondary data analysis, structural equation modeling was used to test the theoretical model. Empowerment was added as an exogenous variable, and nursing job satisfaction was the final outcome variable. The practice domain variables mediated the impact of empowerment on job satisfaction. Results: All paths were significant. The model fit the data well (?2 96.42 [10, N=276], p<.001, CFI=.910, NNFI=.901, RMSEA=.177). Empowerment contributed to job satisfaction directly and indirectly through the five practice domains (R2=53%). Nursing leadership was the key practice domain that influenced the other four. Conclusions: The Nursing Worklife Model may be used to explain the influence of practice domains on job satisfaction, and is applicable to American healthcare environments. Use of the revised model may enhance the quality of nurses' worklives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Nursing Worklife Model: Extending and Refining a New Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161122-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Nursing Worklife Model: Extending and Refining a New Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 4306, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-936-3055</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmanojlo@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather K. Laschinger, PhD, RN, Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The twofold purpose of this secondary data analysis was to test an emerging theoretical framework on a sample of American nurses, and to revise the theory to include variables other than those originally posited. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The Nursing Worklife Model (Leiter &amp; Laschinger, 2005) describes mechanisms through which five practice domains in the hospital environment influence nurses' worklives to affect burnout. Empirical evidence links empowerment and job satisfaction to these same five domains, so we tested an alternate model demonstrating structural empowerment's relationship to five practice domains and ultimately to nurses' job satisfaction. The original model was tested on two large samples of Canadian nurses, who work in a very different environment than American nurses. Subjects/Method: The original study used a non-experimental design to randomly survey 500 hospital nurses throughout Michigan (66% response rate). The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index measured five practice domains, the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II measured empowerment, and the Index of Work Satisfaction measured job satisfaction. In this secondary data analysis, structural equation modeling was used to test the theoretical model. Empowerment was added as an exogenous variable, and nursing job satisfaction was the final outcome variable. The practice domain variables mediated the impact of empowerment on job satisfaction. Results: All paths were significant. The model fit the data well (?2 96.42 [10, N=276], p&lt;.001, CFI=.910, NNFI=.901, RMSEA=.177). Empowerment contributed to job satisfaction directly and indirectly through the five practice domains (R2=53%). Nursing leadership was the key practice domain that influenced the other four. Conclusions: The Nursing Worklife Model may be used to explain the influence of practice domains on job satisfaction, and is applicable to American healthcare environments. Use of the revised model may enhance the quality of nurses' worklives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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