2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161125
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A critical review of Omaha System use at the community level
Abstract:
A critical review of Omaha System use at the community level
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Monsen, Karen, PhD(c), MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, MN 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-2669
Co-Authors:Madeleine J. Kerr, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Karen S. Martin, MSN, RN, FAAN; and Linda Olson Keller, MS, RN
Purpose: To determine the state of the science of using a standardized nursing classification, the Omaha System, to describe community level public health nursing interventions and outcomes.

Conceptual Framework: Transformation of data to information to nursing knowledge.

Background: Electronic health records and information systems are rapidly advancing utilization of standardized classifications in public health nursing settings. The Omaha System is a standardized multidisciplinary classification used in community settings to document assessments and interventions for individuals and families. In 2005, a revision of the 1992 Omaha System was published, and a community modifier term was added to meet the growing need for documentation of community level interventions and outcomes. Several exemplars using the community level modifier have since been developed and published related to diverse topics such as communicable disease outbreak investigation and community-based suicide prevention programs.

Methods: An integrative descriptive review was conducted to critique all published examples of using the Omaha System at the community level. Criteria for assessment of these studies included the populations served, problems addressed, interventions used, reliability of data collection, concurrent validity measures used, outcomes measured, and internal and external controls implemented.

Results: Seven community case studies and reports described diverse populations, problems from all domains of the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme; three of four intervention Categories, and Knowledge, Behavior, and Status outcomes. Data reliability was addressed in one practice setting for two of the case studies. Concurrent validity was addressed in two studies. Limitations included the difficulty reporting novel Omaha System outcome data to the uninitiated, and the usual limitations of observational descriptive studies.

Implications: The Omaha System's three schemata have the capacity to describe community level problems, interventions, and outcomes. These studies provide a beginning platform for research agendas related to use of standardized classifications for community level intervention and outcome research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA critical review of Omaha System use at the community levelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161125-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A critical review of Omaha System use at the community level</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Monsen, Karen, PhD(c), MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, MN 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-2669</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mons0122@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Madeleine J. Kerr, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Karen S. Martin, MSN, RN, FAAN; and Linda Olson Keller, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine the state of the science of using a standardized nursing classification, the Omaha System, to describe community level public health nursing interventions and outcomes.<br/><br/>Conceptual Framework: Transformation of data to information to nursing knowledge.<br/><br/>Background: Electronic health records and information systems are rapidly advancing utilization of standardized classifications in public health nursing settings. The Omaha System is a standardized multidisciplinary classification used in community settings to document assessments and interventions for individuals and families. In 2005, a revision of the 1992 Omaha System was published, and a community modifier term was added to meet the growing need for documentation of community level interventions and outcomes. Several exemplars using the community level modifier have since been developed and published related to diverse topics such as communicable disease outbreak investigation and community-based suicide prevention programs. <br/><br/>Methods: An integrative descriptive review was conducted to critique all published examples of using the Omaha System at the community level. Criteria for assessment of these studies included the populations served, problems addressed, interventions used, reliability of data collection, concurrent validity measures used, outcomes measured, and internal and external controls implemented.<br/><br/>Results: Seven community case studies and reports described diverse populations, problems from all domains of the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme; three of four intervention Categories, and Knowledge, Behavior, and Status outcomes. Data reliability was addressed in one practice setting for two of the case studies. Concurrent validity was addressed in two studies. Limitations included the difficulty reporting novel Omaha System outcome data to the uninitiated, and the usual limitations of observational descriptive studies. <br/><br/>Implications: The Omaha System's three schemata have the capacity to describe community level problems, interventions, and outcomes. These studies provide a beginning platform for research agendas related to use of standardized classifications for community level intervention and outcome research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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