Revolving Doors - Interruptions to the Breastfeeding Dyad: A Comparison Amongst Hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161127
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Revolving Doors - Interruptions to the Breastfeeding Dyad: A Comparison Amongst Hospitals
Abstract:
Revolving Doors - Interruptions to the Breastfeeding Dyad: A Comparison Amongst Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Morrison, Barbara, PhD, CNM, FNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:(216)368-1906
While mothers and newborns are in the hospital much emphasis is placed on helping the dyad breastfeed (BF) successfully. But lactation consultants, nurses and mothers concede that it is hard to provide and receive breastfeeding support and instruction because of frequent interruptions - persons entering the room. Interruptions, an unrecognized institutional barrier to the breastfeeding process, may add to the stress mothers are experiencing during the early postpartum and could contribute to breastfeeding difficulties. Purpose. Compare the frequency, duration, and nature of interruptions to breastfeeding dyads on the 1st postpartum day among urban and suburban maternity units. Theoretical Framework. Barnard's Parent-Infant Interaction Model focusing on the animate environment and its impact on the breastfeeding dyad. Subjects. 90 healthy BF mothers who delivered healthy newborns vaginally, 30 from each hospital. Method. For this descriptive exploratory study research assistants sat outside mother's room from 0800 to 2000 on her 1st postpartum day. They recorded frequency, duration and source of interruptions. Mothers recorded the reasons for interruptions and their breastfeedings. Results. 1577 to 1789 interruptions per hospital were analyzed using measures of central tendency and frequency. Mothers experienced an average of 52-61 interruptions between 0800 and 2000. Average length of the interruptions was 16 minutes, the mode was 1 minute. The family, mother, baby and father, had an average of 19 to 24 periods without any visitors lasting an averaged 7 to 16 minutes and ranging from 1 minute to 3.6 hours. Nursing staff were the most frequent interrupters though the longest interruptions were caused by family and visitors Conclusions. Interruptions to the breastfeeding dyad, a previously unrecognized or described institutional barrier to breastfeeding, are problematic in all maternity units regardless of their size or location. Further research is needed to understand the effects of interruptions on the breastfeeding dyads and process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRevolving Doors - Interruptions to the Breastfeeding Dyad: A Comparison Amongst Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161127-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Revolving Doors - Interruptions to the Breastfeeding Dyad: A Comparison Amongst Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morrison, Barbara, PhD, CNM, FNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(216)368-1906</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara.morrison@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While mothers and newborns are in the hospital much emphasis is placed on helping the dyad breastfeed (BF) successfully. But lactation consultants, nurses and mothers concede that it is hard to provide and receive breastfeeding support and instruction because of frequent interruptions - persons entering the room. Interruptions, an unrecognized institutional barrier to the breastfeeding process, may add to the stress mothers are experiencing during the early postpartum and could contribute to breastfeeding difficulties. Purpose. Compare the frequency, duration, and nature of interruptions to breastfeeding dyads on the 1st postpartum day among urban and suburban maternity units. Theoretical Framework. Barnard's Parent-Infant Interaction Model focusing on the animate environment and its impact on the breastfeeding dyad. Subjects. 90 healthy BF mothers who delivered healthy newborns vaginally, 30 from each hospital. Method. For this descriptive exploratory study research assistants sat outside mother's room from 0800 to 2000 on her 1st postpartum day. They recorded frequency, duration and source of interruptions. Mothers recorded the reasons for interruptions and their breastfeedings. Results. 1577 to 1789 interruptions per hospital were analyzed using measures of central tendency and frequency. Mothers experienced an average of 52-61 interruptions between 0800 and 2000. Average length of the interruptions was 16 minutes, the mode was 1 minute. The family, mother, baby and father, had an average of 19 to 24 periods without any visitors lasting an averaged 7 to 16 minutes and ranging from 1 minute to 3.6 hours. Nursing staff were the most frequent interrupters though the longest interruptions were caused by family and visitors Conclusions. Interruptions to the breastfeeding dyad, a previously unrecognized or described institutional barrier to breastfeeding, are problematic in all maternity units regardless of their size or location. Further research is needed to understand the effects of interruptions on the breastfeeding dyads and process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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