2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161131
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incidence of Microbial Growth on the Anesthesia Machine
Abstract:
Incidence of Microbial Growth on the Anesthesia Machine
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Peterson, James, BSN, MSN(c)
P.I. Institution Name:Bradley University / Decatur Memorial Hospital
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 4520 E. Spruce Street, Decatur, IL, 62526, USA
Contact Telephone:217 413-1966
Co-Authors:Jacklyn L. Ruthman, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Hospital acquired infections are responsible for thousands of deaths each year and cost hospitals and health insurance companies billions of dollars. Many sources of these infections have been identified and subsequent protocols implemented to prevent their transmission. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of microbial growth on the anesthesia machine to determine its potential as a source of infection. Anesthesia equipment can be exposed to potentially infectious material on a daily basis. Florence Nightingale's theory, as it relates to the effects of environment on health served as the theoretical framework for this study. This study was a quantitative research study that used a descriptive design in evaluating the incidence of microbial growth on the anesthesia machine. Micro bacterial cultures were collected from the vaporizer controls, flow meter knobs, drawer handles and table top of the anesthesia machine (n=64). Descriptive statistics revealed that 20% of the cultures contained no growth, 69% contained very light growth and the remaining 11% contained light growth. Micro bacterial growth consisted of opportunistic and non pathogenic type species only; no pathogenic species were identified. Results showed that there was no difference in the amount of growth observed in terms of the date and time a sample was collected, the type of operating room a sample was collected from or the surface from which a sample was obtained. Therefore, current cleaning practices in the one hospital studied appear to be relatively effective in minimizing the amount of growth present on the various parts of the anesthesia machine. This lends support for continued use of present cleaning practices. Further study is needed to establish the effectiveness of other commonly used disinfectant agents and cleaning methods against other microorganisms, including viral contamination. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncidence of Microbial Growth on the Anesthesia Machineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161131-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incidence of Microbial Growth on the Anesthesia Machine</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peterson, James, BSN, MSN(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bradley University / Decatur Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 4520 E. Spruce Street, Decatur, IL, 62526, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">217 413-1966</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jamespeterson33@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacklyn L. Ruthman, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hospital acquired infections are responsible for thousands of deaths each year and cost hospitals and health insurance companies billions of dollars. Many sources of these infections have been identified and subsequent protocols implemented to prevent their transmission. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of microbial growth on the anesthesia machine to determine its potential as a source of infection. Anesthesia equipment can be exposed to potentially infectious material on a daily basis. Florence Nightingale's theory, as it relates to the effects of environment on health served as the theoretical framework for this study. This study was a quantitative research study that used a descriptive design in evaluating the incidence of microbial growth on the anesthesia machine. Micro bacterial cultures were collected from the vaporizer controls, flow meter knobs, drawer handles and table top of the anesthesia machine (n=64). Descriptive statistics revealed that 20% of the cultures contained no growth, 69% contained very light growth and the remaining 11% contained light growth. Micro bacterial growth consisted of opportunistic and non pathogenic type species only; no pathogenic species were identified. Results showed that there was no difference in the amount of growth observed in terms of the date and time a sample was collected, the type of operating room a sample was collected from or the surface from which a sample was obtained. Therefore, current cleaning practices in the one hospital studied appear to be relatively effective in minimizing the amount of growth present on the various parts of the anesthesia machine. This lends support for continued use of present cleaning practices. Further study is needed to establish the effectiveness of other commonly used disinfectant agents and cleaning methods against other microorganisms, including viral contamination. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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