Family Management Style of Lactation in Families With Premature Infants in the NICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161132
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Management Style of Lactation in Families With Premature Infants in the NICU
Abstract:
Family Management Style of Lactation in Families With Premature Infants in the NICU
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3989
Co-Authors:Cynthia A Schmidt, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Patricia Jamerson, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher; Lorraine Seiter, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant; and Joan Smith, MSN, RN, NNP, Nurse Practitioner
Mothers who give birth to premature infants requiring admission to
high risk nurseries are less likely to initiate lactation than mothers of
healthy, term infants (Lefebvre & Duchame, 1989; Meier, Brown, Hurst,
Spatz, Engstrom, Borucki, & Krouse, 2000; Riordan & Auerbach, 1998). Lower
incidence of breastfeeding in the preterm population is most likely a
function of multiple factors. This qualitative, descriptive study was
designed to describe the breastfeeding experience of mother-father couples
who have a premature infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and
to determine the family management style for lactation management used by
these couples. The Family Management Style (Knafl & Deatrick, 1990)
conceptual framework guided the study; naturalistic inquiry served as the
study design. The sample consisted of seven couples who had chosen to
lactate their premature infants who were born at 32 weeks or less of
gestational age and who had been admitted into the NICU of a large,
Midwest childrenÆs hospital. Using qualitative descriptive analysis, data
revealed that the situational context of having a premature infant in the
NICU was defined both positively and negatively. In addition, the Family
Management Style conceptual framework (Knafl & Deatrick, 1990) and the
family management style typologies of facilitating, maintaining, and
obstructing as identified by Krouse (2002) were supported by the data from
this study. This suggests that lactation management behaviors may be
reflective of the familyÆs interpretation of personal roles, values, and
authority already in place prior to the birth of the premature infant.
Nursing interventions that will promote the development of, or
continuation of, positive management styles may ultimately benefit
families who have premature infants hospitalized in the NICU and who are
at high risk for lactation failure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Management Style of Lactation in Families With Premature Infants in the NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161132-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Management Style of Lactation in Families With Premature Infants in the NICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3989</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbernai@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia A Schmidt, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Patricia Jamerson, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher; Lorraine Seiter, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant; and Joan Smith, MSN, RN, NNP, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mothers who give birth to premature infants requiring admission to <br/> high risk nurseries are less likely to initiate lactation than mothers of <br/> healthy, term infants (Lefebvre &amp; Duchame, 1989; Meier, Brown, Hurst, <br/> Spatz, Engstrom, Borucki, &amp; Krouse, 2000; Riordan &amp; Auerbach, 1998). Lower <br/> incidence of breastfeeding in the preterm population is most likely a <br/> function of multiple factors. This qualitative, descriptive study was <br/> designed to describe the breastfeeding experience of mother-father couples <br/> who have a premature infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and <br/> to determine the family management style for lactation management used by <br/> these couples. The Family Management Style (Knafl &amp; Deatrick, 1990) <br/> conceptual framework guided the study; naturalistic inquiry served as the <br/> study design. The sample consisted of seven couples who had chosen to <br/> lactate their premature infants who were born at 32 weeks or less of <br/> gestational age and who had been admitted into the NICU of a large, <br/> Midwest children&AElig;s hospital. Using qualitative descriptive analysis, data <br/> revealed that the situational context of having a premature infant in the <br/> NICU was defined both positively and negatively. In addition, the Family <br/> Management Style conceptual framework (Knafl &amp; Deatrick, 1990) and the <br/> family management style typologies of facilitating, maintaining, and <br/> obstructing as identified by Krouse (2002) were supported by the data from <br/> this study. This suggests that lactation management behaviors may be <br/> reflective of the family&AElig;s interpretation of personal roles, values, and <br/> authority already in place prior to the birth of the premature infant. <br/> Nursing interventions that will promote the development of, or <br/> continuation of, positive management styles may ultimately benefit <br/> families who have premature infants hospitalized in the NICU and who are <br/> at high risk for lactation failure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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