2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Interactive Communication Between Mothers and Their Premature Infants
Abstract:
Patterns of Interactive Communication Between Mothers and Their Premature Infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bozzette, Maryann, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312 996 0516
Introduction: Interactive communication between young infants and
mothers is a particularly salient social experience. During early
communication, a mother models and reinforces sounds and expressions that
ultimately lead to the development of words. The amount and quality of
these exchanges help to determine social and interactive abilities and
speech and language performance. Premature infants typically display less
preference for novelty and have shorter periods of attention. They also
show a less intense and often delayed response to stimulation.
Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine the sequencing of
vocal and nonvocal behavior between premature infants and their mothers.
Sample: Premature infants born between 26 and 32 weeks gestation
Method: Videotaped observations were made of 20 premature infant ûmother
dyads on 3 occasions: at approximately 36 weeks gestation, again at 42
weeks gestation, and at 4 months corrected age. The videotapes were 45
minutes in length and recorded natural interactions between the infant and
mother during a period of wakefulness.
Analysis: Extensive behavioral coding of the videotaped data has been
conducted using a coding schema developed for this study. The frequency
and duration of specific vocal and nonvocal behaviors will be determined.
Sequential analysis will be used to model the transitional and conditional
probabilities for vocal and nonvocal behaviors of the infants and mothers.
The progression of early communication patterns over the first 4 months
will be determined using the mixed general linear model.
Nursing implications: Mothers and infants develop synchronous patterns of
interaction that encourages vocalization and animated behavior. Premature
infants do not have the opportunity to engage in consistent interactive
communication with their mothers for several weeks, and often experience
noxious stimulation in the NICU. This study will describe their patterns
of behavior, and will help to design interventions to improve early
communication efforts of premature infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Interactive Communication Between Mothers and Their Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Interactive Communication Between Mothers and Their Premature Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bozzette, Maryann, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312 996 0516</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bozzette@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Interactive communication between young infants and <br/> mothers is a particularly salient social experience. During early <br/> communication, a mother models and reinforces sounds and expressions that <br/> ultimately lead to the development of words. The amount and quality of <br/> these exchanges help to determine social and interactive abilities and <br/> speech and language performance. Premature infants typically display less <br/> preference for novelty and have shorter periods of attention. They also <br/> show a less intense and often delayed response to stimulation. <br/> Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine the sequencing of <br/> vocal and nonvocal behavior between premature infants and their mothers. <br/> Sample: Premature infants born between 26 and 32 weeks gestation <br/> Method: Videotaped observations were made of 20 premature infant &ucirc;mother <br/> dyads on 3 occasions: at approximately 36 weeks gestation, again at 42 <br/> weeks gestation, and at 4 months corrected age. The videotapes were 45 <br/> minutes in length and recorded natural interactions between the infant and <br/> mother during a period of wakefulness.<br/> Analysis: Extensive behavioral coding of the videotaped data has been <br/> conducted using a coding schema developed for this study. The frequency <br/> and duration of specific vocal and nonvocal behaviors will be determined. <br/> Sequential analysis will be used to model the transitional and conditional <br/> probabilities for vocal and nonvocal behaviors of the infants and mothers. <br/> The progression of early communication patterns over the first 4 months <br/> will be determined using the mixed general linear model.<br/> Nursing implications: Mothers and infants develop synchronous patterns of <br/> interaction that encourages vocalization and animated behavior. Premature <br/> infants do not have the opportunity to engage in consistent interactive <br/> communication with their mothers for several weeks, and often experience <br/> noxious stimulation in the NICU. This study will describe their patterns <br/> of behavior, and will help to design interventions to improve early <br/> communication efforts of premature infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.