Antipsychotic Medications: Pattern Profiles of Schizophrenia Consumers' Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161135
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Antipsychotic Medications: Pattern Profiles of Schizophrenia Consumers' Experiences
Abstract:
Antipsychotic Medications: Pattern Profiles of Schizophrenia Consumers' Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brady, Noreen, PhD, MSN, CNS, LPCC
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-1867
Purpose: Increasing awareness exists of schizophrenia consumers'
"partial compliance" with antipsychotic medications. Taking these
medications erratically, or not at all, reduces the consumerÆs ability to
manage symptoms and achieve personal social, educational, and vocational
goals. The purpose of this presentation is to report pattern profiles of
schizophrenia consumersÆ experiences with anti-psychotic medications and
how these experiences affect their recovery efforts and relationships with
health care providers.
Theoretical /Conceptual Framework: Pattern Profiles of schizophrenia
consumers' experiences with antipsychotic medications were constructed
from a subset of a larger study of family life with a member diagnosed
with schizophrenia. The original study was conducted using the Unitary
Field Pattern Profile method (Butcher, 1994, 1998), a method based in
Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings.
Participants: Six single adult male schizophrenia consumers who were
prescribed antipsychotic medications participated. Four of the six lived
independently, one lived with his mother, and one lived in a group home.
Method: In-person, open-ended interviews were conducted and audio taped.
While synthesizing personal pattern profiles from interview transcripts,
themes related to experiences and attitudes toward antipsychotic
medications emerged.
Results: Consumers' experiences with antipsychotic medications were
primarily negative. Noxious side-effects from older or "typical"
antipsychotic medications were frequently reported, including sedation,
stiffness, difficulty thinking, unusual gait, and altered physical
appearance. While the newer, or "atypical", antipsychotic medications
generated fewer specific complaints, some clients reported distressing
medication-related weight gain. No consumer reported absence of symptoms
even when taking medications conscientiously. Auditory hallucinations
continued unabated, but consumers reported an increased ability to
tolerate the "voices". Dread of increased dosages or the addition of more
medications precluded consumers from reporting any symptom increase or
reoccurrence with their psychiatrist or therapist.
Conclusions: Increased awareness of consumers' past experiences with
antipsychotic medications and effects on current "compliance" will aid
psychiatric nurses work with these individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAntipsychotic Medications: Pattern Profiles of Schizophrenia Consumers' Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161135-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Antipsychotic Medications: Pattern Profiles of Schizophrenia Consumers' Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brady, Noreen, PhD, MSN, CNS, LPCC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-1867</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nxb7@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Increasing awareness exists of schizophrenia consumers'<br/> &quot;partial compliance&quot; with antipsychotic medications. Taking these <br/> medications erratically, or not at all, reduces the consumer&AElig;s ability to <br/> manage symptoms and achieve personal social, educational, and vocational <br/> goals. The purpose of this presentation is to report pattern profiles of <br/> schizophrenia consumers&AElig; experiences with anti-psychotic medications and <br/> how these experiences affect their recovery efforts and relationships with <br/> health care providers.<br/> Theoretical /Conceptual Framework: Pattern Profiles of schizophrenia <br/> consumers' experiences with antipsychotic medications were constructed <br/> from a subset of a larger study of family life with a member diagnosed <br/> with schizophrenia. The original study was conducted using the Unitary <br/> Field Pattern Profile method (Butcher, 1994, 1998), a method based in <br/> Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings. <br/> Participants: Six single adult male schizophrenia consumers who were <br/> prescribed antipsychotic medications participated. Four of the six lived <br/> independently, one lived with his mother, and one lived in a group home.<br/> Method: In-person, open-ended interviews were conducted and audio taped. <br/> While synthesizing personal pattern profiles from interview transcripts, <br/> themes related to experiences and attitudes toward antipsychotic <br/> medications emerged.<br/> Results: Consumers' experiences with antipsychotic medications were <br/> primarily negative. Noxious side-effects from older or &quot;typical&quot; <br/> antipsychotic medications were frequently reported, including sedation, <br/> stiffness, difficulty thinking, unusual gait, and altered physical <br/> appearance. While the newer, or &quot;atypical&quot;, antipsychotic medications <br/> generated fewer specific complaints, some clients reported distressing <br/> medication-related weight gain. No consumer reported absence of symptoms <br/> even when taking medications conscientiously. Auditory hallucinations <br/> continued unabated, but consumers reported an increased ability to <br/> tolerate the &quot;voices&quot;. Dread of increased dosages or the addition of more <br/> medications precluded consumers from reporting any symptom increase or <br/> reoccurrence with their psychiatrist or therapist. <br/> Conclusions: Increased awareness of consumers' past experiences with <br/> antipsychotic medications and effects on current &quot;compliance&quot; will aid <br/> psychiatric nurses work with these individuals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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