2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161136
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Adverse Drug Events and Improving Medication Outcomes
Abstract:
Reducing Adverse Drug Events and Improving Medication Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brokel, Jane, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Trinity Health
Title:Director
Contact Address:Clinical and Physician Services, 176 Pleasant Manor Drive, Waterford, MI, 48327, USA
Contact Telephone:248-489-6847
The purpose of this research tested the effectiveness of two
medication safety improvements aimed at reducing adverse drug events
(ADEs) with patients using anticoagulants, diuretics, or digoxin, and
improving documentation of ADEs in rural facilities. Three hospitals, six
rural clinics, four retail pharmacies, an education center, and the
university used a committee of health professionals to guide project
activities. The hospital and community ISMPs were used to assess existing
work processes. Interventions included adoption of four protocols to
support dosing and monitoring of warfarin, low-molecular weight heparin,
diuretics and digoxin; PDAs and desktop computer web software to increase
drug-drug interaction profiling beyond pharmacies; and patient education
on carrying medication lists, getting medications checked for
interactions, completing laboratory tests, and knowing when to call for
help. A pre-post secondary data analysis of administrative hospital data
sets evaluated the change in number of ICD-9CM event codes for
anticoagulants, diuretics and digoxin during the year prior to
interventions and the year the intervention activities were performed. The
findings demonstrated coded ADEs in 0.308% of interventional site and
0.386% of control site patients prior to interventions. During
intervention year, the ADEs reduced to 0.19% at intervention site and
0.52% at control site. The number of anticoagulant ADEs were significantly
less within the intervention site (0.013, Fisher Exact test). The ADEs
with diuretics (p=0.19) and digoxin (p=0.11) were less at the intervention
site but not significant. Ninety percent of participants carried
medication lists, profiled medications for interactions, and completed
prescribed lab tests. The drug-drug interaction checking and common
protocols among providers promoted repeatable medication safety procedures
and messages to patients. The use of PDAs in the clinic setting allowed
physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners to profile
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Adverse Drug Events and Improving Medication Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161136-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Adverse Drug Events and Improving Medication Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brokel, Jane, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Trinity Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Clinical and Physician Services, 176 Pleasant Manor Drive, Waterford, MI, 48327, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248-489-6847</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbroke101@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research tested the effectiveness of two <br/> medication safety improvements aimed at reducing adverse drug events <br/> (ADEs) with patients using anticoagulants, diuretics, or digoxin, and <br/> improving documentation of ADEs in rural facilities. Three hospitals, six <br/> rural clinics, four retail pharmacies, an education center, and the <br/> university used a committee of health professionals to guide project <br/> activities. The hospital and community ISMPs were used to assess existing <br/> work processes. Interventions included adoption of four protocols to <br/> support dosing and monitoring of warfarin, low-molecular weight heparin, <br/> diuretics and digoxin; PDAs and desktop computer web software to increase <br/> drug-drug interaction profiling beyond pharmacies; and patient education <br/> on carrying medication lists, getting medications checked for <br/> interactions, completing laboratory tests, and knowing when to call for <br/> help. A pre-post secondary data analysis of administrative hospital data <br/> sets evaluated the change in number of ICD-9CM event codes for <br/> anticoagulants, diuretics and digoxin during the year prior to <br/> interventions and the year the intervention activities were performed. The <br/> findings demonstrated coded ADEs in 0.308% of interventional site and <br/> 0.386% of control site patients prior to interventions. During <br/> intervention year, the ADEs reduced to 0.19% at intervention site and <br/> 0.52% at control site. The number of anticoagulant ADEs were significantly <br/> less within the intervention site (0.013, Fisher Exact test). The ADEs <br/> with diuretics (p=0.19) and digoxin (p=0.11) were less at the intervention <br/> site but not significant. Ninety percent of participants carried <br/> medication lists, profiled medications for interactions, and completed <br/> prescribed lab tests. The drug-drug interaction checking and common <br/> protocols among providers promoted repeatable medication safety procedures <br/> and messages to patients. The use of PDAs in the clinic setting allowed <br/> physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners to profile</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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