2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161141
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Testing of a New Pain Assessment Behavior Scale (PABS)
Abstract:
Psychometric Testing of a New Pain Assessment Behavior Scale (PABS)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Campbell, Margaret, RN, PhDc, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Detroit Receiving Hospital
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
Contact Telephone:313 745-3271
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Renaud, RN, MSN, CS, Nurse Practitioner and Linda Vanni, RN, MSN, CS, Clinical Nurse Specialist
Purpose: To establish the internal consistency and construct validity of a new instrument to measure the presence and intensity of pain for patients who cannot self-report. Conceptual framework: Nociceptive responses activated by pain produce measurable behaviors. Some patients with pain are unable to use self-report instruments due to illness severity or cognitive impairment. An observation scale that measures pain is postulated to have clinical and research utility. Subjects: A convenience sample of 316 adult men and women patients were recruited from three hospitals and a cancer institute in one urban medical center. All subjects provided a self-report about pain. Patients with drug or alcohol abuse histories, or chronic non-malignant pain were excluded. Method: Subjects were assessed at rest. The patientÆs pain behaviors were rated using the PABS. Subsequently, the patient was asked to give a numeric score to current pain with "0" representing no pain and "0" the worst pain. Other variables collected included age, gender, race, pain type, and primary diagnosis. Results: Eleven patients were excluded post hoc leaving a sample of 305 subjects for analysis. The subjects were women (56%), African-American (70%) and Caucasian (29%) who were experiencing visceral (31%), bone/muscle (32%), incisional (29%), or neuropathic (8%) pain. Subjects had medical diagnoses (53%), surgery or trauma (30%), or cancer (17%). The patient's report correlated with the observed behaviors (r=.694, p=.000). The reported pain score (mean=4.2 plus or minus 3.5) was significantly higher than the PABS score (mean=2.16 plus or minus 2.8) (t=13.08, p=.000). Internal consistency of this five variable scale is strong (alpha=.88). Conclusions: The instrument is reliable and performed well within and between diagnoses with both men and women. A difference in pain scores may result from inflated self-reports or masked behaviors. Further testing is needed with subjects who cannot self-report.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Testing of a New Pain Assessment Behavior Scale (PABS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161141-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychometric Testing of a New Pain Assessment Behavior Scale (PABS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Campbell, Margaret, RN, PhDc, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Detroit Receiving Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 4201 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313 745-3271</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcampbe3@dmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Renaud, RN, MSN, CS, Nurse Practitioner and Linda Vanni, RN, MSN, CS, Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To establish the internal consistency and construct validity of a new instrument to measure the presence and intensity of pain for patients who cannot self-report. Conceptual framework: Nociceptive responses activated by pain produce measurable behaviors. Some patients with pain are unable to use self-report instruments due to illness severity or cognitive impairment. An observation scale that measures pain is postulated to have clinical and research utility. Subjects: A convenience sample of 316 adult men and women patients were recruited from three hospitals and a cancer institute in one urban medical center. All subjects provided a self-report about pain. Patients with drug or alcohol abuse histories, or chronic non-malignant pain were excluded. Method: Subjects were assessed at rest. The patient&AElig;s pain behaviors were rated using the PABS. Subsequently, the patient was asked to give a numeric score to current pain with &quot;0&quot; representing no pain and &quot;0&quot; the worst pain. Other variables collected included age, gender, race, pain type, and primary diagnosis. Results: Eleven patients were excluded post hoc leaving a sample of 305 subjects for analysis. The subjects were women (56%), African-American (70%) and Caucasian (29%) who were experiencing visceral (31%), bone/muscle (32%), incisional (29%), or neuropathic (8%) pain. Subjects had medical diagnoses (53%), surgery or trauma (30%), or cancer (17%). The patient's report correlated with the observed behaviors (r=.694, p=.000). The reported pain score (mean=4.2 plus or minus 3.5) was significantly higher than the PABS score (mean=2.16 plus or minus 2.8) (t=13.08, p=.000). Internal consistency of this five variable scale is strong (alpha=.88). Conclusions: The instrument is reliable and performed well within and between diagnoses with both men and women. A difference in pain scores may result from inflated self-reports or masked behaviors. Further testing is needed with subjects who cannot self-report.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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