2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161143
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethnic Differences in Adolescents' Social Stress, Resources, and Mental Distress
Abstract:
Ethnic Differences in Adolescents' Social Stress, Resources, and Mental Distress
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Choi, Heeseung, DNS, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-9044
Co-Authors:Janet C. Meininger, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Robert E Roberts, PhD, Professor
Purpose: This cross-sectional study tested the hypothesis that
adolescents experience different types and degrees of social stress
(general social stress, process-oriented stress, discrimination),
resources (family relationships, coping, self-esteem), and mental distress
(depression, somatic symptoms, suicidal ideation) depending on their
ethnicity. Ethnic minority adolescents, particularly Hispanics, were
expected to experience higher level of social stress and to have higher
risk for mental distress than Anglo-Americans. This study also examined
the interaction effect of ethnicity and social stress on mental distress
as well as the interaction effect of ethnicity and resources on mental
distress. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Choi's model incorporating the
concept of "ethnicity" into Hovey and King's Model of acculturative
stress, depression, and suicidal ideation guided this study.
Subjects/Methods: Respondents included 287 middle-school students (144
Anglo-Americans, 66 African-Americans, and 77 Hispanics). They completed
self-administered questionnaires: The DSM Scale for Depression, Somatic
Symptom Scale, Social, Attitudinal, Familial, and Environmental Scale for
Children, Family Environment Scale, Coping Scale, and Rosenberg's
Self-Esteem Scale. To analyze the data, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and logistic
regression analysis were used. Results: While Anglo-Americans,
African-Americans, and Hispanics didnÆt differ in the level of mental
distress, Hispanics had a higher risk for suicidal ideation than
Anglo-Americans and Hispanic females were at higher risk for depression
than Anglo-American males. Additionally, compared to Anglo-Americans,
Hispanics reported significantly higher scores on all three types of
social stress. Compared to Anglo-Americans, African-Americans had higher
scores on process-oriented stress and discrimination. Significant
interaction effects were observed between ethnicity and social stress for
somatic symptoms among African-Americans and Hispanics. Conclusions: The
findings indicated that African-Americans and Hispanics experience a
considerable amount of social stress although they may not present
noticeable symptoms of mental distress. Longitudinal studies are needed to
explore the long-term effects of social stress in the development of
mental distress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthnic Differences in Adolescents' Social Stress, Resources, and Mental Distressen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161143-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethnic Differences in Adolescents' Social Stress, Resources, and Mental Distress</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Heeseung, DNS, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-9044</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hchoi20@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet C. Meininger, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Robert E Roberts, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This cross-sectional study tested the hypothesis that <br/> adolescents experience different types and degrees of social stress <br/> (general social stress, process-oriented stress, discrimination), <br/> resources (family relationships, coping, self-esteem), and mental distress <br/> (depression, somatic symptoms, suicidal ideation) depending on their <br/> ethnicity. Ethnic minority adolescents, particularly Hispanics, were <br/> expected to experience higher level of social stress and to have higher <br/> risk for mental distress than Anglo-Americans. This study also examined <br/> the interaction effect of ethnicity and social stress on mental distress <br/> as well as the interaction effect of ethnicity and resources on mental <br/> distress. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Choi's model incorporating the <br/> concept of &quot;ethnicity&quot; into Hovey and King's Model of acculturative <br/> stress, depression, and suicidal ideation guided this study. <br/> Subjects/Methods: Respondents included 287 middle-school students (144 <br/> Anglo-Americans, 66 African-Americans, and 77 Hispanics). They completed <br/> self-administered questionnaires: The DSM Scale for Depression, Somatic <br/> Symptom Scale, Social, Attitudinal, Familial, and Environmental Scale for <br/> Children, Family Environment Scale, Coping Scale, and Rosenberg's <br/> Self-Esteem Scale. To analyze the data, ANOVA, ANCOVA, and logistic <br/> regression analysis were used. Results: While Anglo-Americans, <br/> African-Americans, and Hispanics didn&AElig;t differ in the level of mental <br/> distress, Hispanics had a higher risk for suicidal ideation than <br/> Anglo-Americans and Hispanic females were at higher risk for depression <br/> than Anglo-American males. Additionally, compared to Anglo-Americans, <br/> Hispanics reported significantly higher scores on all three types of <br/> social stress. Compared to Anglo-Americans, African-Americans had higher <br/> scores on process-oriented stress and discrimination. Significant <br/> interaction effects were observed between ethnicity and social stress for <br/> somatic symptoms among African-Americans and Hispanics. Conclusions: The <br/> findings indicated that African-Americans and Hispanics experience a <br/> considerable amount of social stress although they may not present <br/> noticeable symptoms of mental distress. Longitudinal studies are needed to <br/> explore the long-term effects of social stress in the development of <br/> mental distress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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