2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161146
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Observing the Work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Observing the Work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Darmody, Julie, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-3118
The Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) is an advanced practice nurse with
graduate preparation as a clinical expert within a specialty area of
nursing practice. There is a lack of data about the activities,
interventions, outcomes, and costs associated with CNS practice. The
purpose of this pilot study was to observe the work of the CNS in the
acute care setting and develop a tool for recording the activities of the
CNS. The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) model
for CNS practice was the organizing framework for the study. This
framework provides a more holistic view of CNS practice than the
traditional sub-role framework. The CNS utilizes clinical expertise within
a specialty area to influence patients/clients, nurses and nursing
practice, and the organization or system. CNS practice is focused on
achieving quality, cost-effective outcomes. Five unit-based CNS's in one
acute care setting participated as subjects in the pilot study. The method
used was direct observation and time study of CNS practice for a total of
twenty hours during July and August of 2003. The investigator recorded a
description of the CNS activities observed and time involved using a
digital stopwatch. CNS's spent 30% of time in patient-focused activities,
44% of time in nurse-focused activities, 10% of time in
organization-focused activities and 16% of time in other activities. Ten
patient-focused activities, five nursing-focused activities, five
organization-focused activities, and three categories of other activities
were identified. The NACNS model of CNS practice has provided a useful
framework for a data collection tool that can be utilized in a larger
study that analyzes the work of the acute care CNS. Acknowledgements: This
research is supported by a grant from the Nurses Foundation of Wisconsin.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleObserving the Work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161146-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Observing the Work of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Darmody, Julie, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-3118</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jvdarmody@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) is an advanced practice nurse with <br/> graduate preparation as a clinical expert within a specialty area of <br/> nursing practice. There is a lack of data about the activities, <br/> interventions, outcomes, and costs associated with CNS practice. The <br/> purpose of this pilot study was to observe the work of the CNS in the <br/> acute care setting and develop a tool for recording the activities of the <br/> CNS. The National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) model <br/> for CNS practice was the organizing framework for the study. This <br/> framework provides a more holistic view of CNS practice than the <br/> traditional sub-role framework. The CNS utilizes clinical expertise within <br/> a specialty area to influence patients/clients, nurses and nursing <br/> practice, and the organization or system. CNS practice is focused on <br/> achieving quality, cost-effective outcomes. Five unit-based CNS's in one <br/> acute care setting participated as subjects in the pilot study. The method <br/> used was direct observation and time study of CNS practice for a total of <br/> twenty hours during July and August of 2003. The investigator recorded a <br/> description of the CNS activities observed and time involved using a <br/> digital stopwatch. CNS's spent 30% of time in patient-focused activities, <br/> 44% of time in nurse-focused activities, 10% of time in <br/> organization-focused activities and 16% of time in other activities. Ten <br/> patient-focused activities, five nursing-focused activities, five <br/> organization-focused activities, and three categories of other activities <br/> were identified. The NACNS model of CNS practice has provided a useful <br/> framework for a data collection tool that can be utilized in a larger <br/> study that analyzes the work of the acute care CNS. Acknowledgements: This <br/> research is supported by a grant from the Nurses Foundation of Wisconsin.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.