2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161151
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Health-Related Goals of Pregnant Women
Abstract:
The Health-Related Goals of Pregnant Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ehlers, Kimberly
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-5271
During pregnancy women may have a high level of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to alter their health-related activities, often to prevent complications during gestation and birth. Pregnancy is now considered a unique time for behavior modification and is no longer considered to be a time of limitations and restrictions. Researchers are focusing on individualizing interventions for health behavior change, but they usually focus on health behaviors chosen by themselves, not participants. There is little research that has examined self-determined goals that pregnant women set or the obstacles they may have in meeting those goals. The purpose of this study is to identify the health-related goals of pregnant women. Based on theories and research on motivation and goal setting, behavioral interventions can be more effective when based on participants' goals. Goal setting strategies have been extensively studied in the industrial and laboratory settings; however specific strategies for women setting health-related goals are lacking. Participants (N=50) will be women identified as recipients of prenatal care in a clinic setting. Eligibility requirements will include: women with a self-reported pregnancy, the ability to read and write English and a minimum age of eighteen. This descriptive study will assess the health-related goals of pregnant women. A brief, anonymous questionnaire will be used to ascertain information about a) women's health-related goals and steps in reaching them, b) current symptoms, c) overall health and d) background information. Responses will be analyzed with content analysis to determine themes. If researchers can discover these health-related goals, then clinicians may be better able to help women, by tailoring interventions to meet their individual needs. Tailoring interventions aimed at achieving the health-related goals of pregnant women may have an impact on the prevention of pregnancy complications and may improve the overall health of the mother.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Health-Related Goals of Pregnant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161151-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Health-Related Goals of Pregnant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ehlers, Kimberly</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-5271</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksehlers@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">During pregnancy women may have a high level of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation to alter their health-related activities, often to prevent complications during gestation and birth. Pregnancy is now considered a unique time for behavior modification and is no longer considered to be a time of limitations and restrictions. Researchers are focusing on individualizing interventions for health behavior change, but they usually focus on health behaviors chosen by themselves, not participants. There is little research that has examined self-determined goals that pregnant women set or the obstacles they may have in meeting those goals. The purpose of this study is to identify the health-related goals of pregnant women. Based on theories and research on motivation and goal setting, behavioral interventions can be more effective when based on participants' goals. Goal setting strategies have been extensively studied in the industrial and laboratory settings; however specific strategies for women setting health-related goals are lacking. Participants (N=50) will be women identified as recipients of prenatal care in a clinic setting. Eligibility requirements will include: women with a self-reported pregnancy, the ability to read and write English and a minimum age of eighteen. This descriptive study will assess the health-related goals of pregnant women. A brief, anonymous questionnaire will be used to ascertain information about a) women's health-related goals and steps in reaching them, b) current symptoms, c) overall health and d) background information. Responses will be analyzed with content analysis to determine themes. If researchers can discover these health-related goals, then clinicians may be better able to help women, by tailoring interventions to meet their individual needs. Tailoring interventions aimed at achieving the health-related goals of pregnant women may have an impact on the prevention of pregnancy complications and may improve the overall health of the mother.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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