2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161152
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How to sustain a breastfeeding-friendly environment in only 5 years
Abstract:
How to sustain a breastfeeding-friendly environment in only 5 years
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ellerbee, Susan, PhD, RN, C, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1100 N. Stonewall, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117-1297, USA
Contact Telephone:405-271-2025, ext. 122
Co-Authors:Rebecca Mannel, BS, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant and Sheila T Myers, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher
Purpose: To describe current status and perceptions of activities and
policies instituted by an academic medical center to implement the Ten
Steps of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).
Theoretical/ Conceptual Framework: Evidence-based practice, change theory
Subjects: Nursing & medical administrators, physicians/residents,
lactation consultant(s), plus staff nurses for 5-year-follow-up.
Methods: Delaware Valley Hospital Policy Survey (Kovach, 1996) was
completed at three points: 1997 (year before major changes), 1999 (one
year after initiation of major changes), and 2001 (three years after major
changes). Data collection is in progress (2004, five years after major
changes). Breastfeeding rates, estimated in 1997, are tracked through a
computerized patient data system.
Results: Survey scores indicate a move from "low implementation" in 1997
to "moderately high implementation" in 1999 and 2001. Data for 2004 are
not yet available. Breastfeeding initiation rate rose from 30% to
approximately 45%. One part-time and five full-time lactation consultants
have been hired. The hospital received a BFHI Certificate of Intent in
August, 2001. Although some breastfeeding babies still receive artificial
baby milk (ABM), syringe, gavage or cup are frequently used. Pacifiers are
given only on request. An evidence-based breastfeeding class is part of
orientation for new staff, including medical residents. Breastfeeding
information is part of mandatory annual education fairs for all staff. A
lactation consultant teaches breastfeeding in prenatal classes. An
outpatient lactation clinic is open. Data collection for newborns is being
expanded to include breastfeeding status at hospital discharge.
Conclusion: Formal policies, education, and support services are in place.
BFHI-specific challenges include initiating breastfeeding within the first
hour after birth, using artificial baby milk without a medical indication
and accepting free supplies of infant formula. Our progress could not be
maintained without the staff nurses who remain as the primary advocates
for breastfeeding women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow to sustain a breastfeeding-friendly environment in only 5 yearsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161152-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How to sustain a breastfeeding-friendly environment in only 5 years</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ellerbee, Susan, PhD, RN, C, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1100 N. Stonewall, Oklahoma City, OK, 73117-1297, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">405-271-2025, ext. 122</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan-ellerbee@ouhsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rebecca Mannel, BS, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant and Sheila T Myers, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe current status and perceptions of activities and <br/> policies instituted by an academic medical center to implement the Ten <br/> Steps of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI).<br/> Theoretical/ Conceptual Framework: Evidence-based practice, change theory<br/> Subjects: Nursing &amp; medical administrators, physicians/residents, <br/> lactation consultant(s), plus staff nurses for 5-year-follow-up. <br/> Methods: Delaware Valley Hospital Policy Survey (Kovach, 1996) was <br/> completed at three points: 1997 (year before major changes), 1999 (one <br/> year after initiation of major changes), and 2001 (three years after major <br/> changes). Data collection is in progress (2004, five years after major <br/> changes). Breastfeeding rates, estimated in 1997, are tracked through a <br/> computerized patient data system.<br/> Results: Survey scores indicate a move from &quot;low implementation&quot; in 1997 <br/> to &quot;moderately high implementation&quot; in 1999 and 2001. Data for 2004 are <br/> not yet available. Breastfeeding initiation rate rose from 30% to <br/> approximately 45%. One part-time and five full-time lactation consultants <br/> have been hired. The hospital received a BFHI Certificate of Intent in <br/> August, 2001. Although some breastfeeding babies still receive artificial <br/> baby milk (ABM), syringe, gavage or cup are frequently used. Pacifiers are <br/> given only on request. An evidence-based breastfeeding class is part of <br/> orientation for new staff, including medical residents. Breastfeeding <br/> information is part of mandatory annual education fairs for all staff. A <br/> lactation consultant teaches breastfeeding in prenatal classes. An <br/> outpatient lactation clinic is open. Data collection for newborns is being <br/> expanded to include breastfeeding status at hospital discharge. <br/> Conclusion: Formal policies, education, and support services are in place. <br/> BFHI-specific challenges include initiating breastfeeding within the first <br/> hour after birth, using artificial baby milk without a medical indication <br/> and accepting free supplies of infant formula. Our progress could not be <br/> maintained without the staff nurses who remain as the primary advocates <br/> for breastfeeding women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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