Translating Benner's Model and Domains of Practice into Psychiatric Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161155
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Translating Benner's Model and Domains of Practice into Psychiatric Nursing Practice
Abstract:
Translating Benner's Model and Domains of Practice into Psychiatric Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Forsyth, Diane, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 859 30th Ave. South, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA
Contact Telephone:507-280-5036
Co-Authors:Cathy Shea, MS, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Kathy Fritsche, RN, Nurse Practitioner; and Randy Jenson, RN, Nurse Practitioner
Staff RN's in one large Midwestern medical center inpatient
psychiatric acute care unit wondered if their lived experiences were the
same as those reported in BennerÆs works (Novice to Expert). The purpose
of this exploratory research was to see if these nursing staff could (a)
verbalize use of Benner's model of Novice to Expert (1984) in their daily
clinical practice and (b) if they could verbalize clinical practical
elements that fit Benner's Domains of Nursing Practice. The method was
interpretive phenomenology, similar to Benner's method. Two tape-recorded
interviews were done with eight staff RNÆs from an inpatient acute
psychiatric unit using semi-structured questions. These RN's were asked to
self-evaluate in which of BennerÆs five stages they belonged. Van Kaam's
method of phenomenological analysis was used to explore their levels of
practice. Six themes emerged, including "knowing myself" and "what I do".
Content analysis was used to explore the domains of practice. Domains with
the highest numbers of verbalizations were: diagnostic and monitoring,
organizational and work-role competencies, and the helping domain.
Findings for both questions supported those of Benner and affirmed what
psychiatric nurses do in their daily practice. Being patient centered
emerged for both questions. Nursing implications include planning unit
staffing with a mix of RN's who practice from novice to expert. The
presentation will also offer insights into daily practice, such as "always
watching one another" for fostering learning and using the "sixth sense"
to manage the unit environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranslating Benner's Model and Domains of Practice into Psychiatric Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161155-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Translating Benner's Model and Domains of Practice into Psychiatric Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forsyth, Diane, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 859 30th Ave. South, Rochester, MN, 55904-4497, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-280-5036</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dforsyth@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cathy Shea, MS, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Kathy Fritsche, RN, Nurse Practitioner; and Randy Jenson, RN, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Staff RN's in one large Midwestern medical center inpatient <br/> psychiatric acute care unit wondered if their lived experiences were the <br/> same as those reported in Benner&AElig;s works (Novice to Expert). The purpose <br/> of this exploratory research was to see if these nursing staff could (a) <br/> verbalize use of Benner's model of Novice to Expert (1984) in their daily <br/> clinical practice and (b) if they could verbalize clinical practical <br/> elements that fit Benner's Domains of Nursing Practice. The method was <br/> interpretive phenomenology, similar to Benner's method. Two tape-recorded <br/> interviews were done with eight staff RN&AElig;s from an inpatient acute <br/> psychiatric unit using semi-structured questions. These RN's were asked to <br/> self-evaluate in which of Benner&AElig;s five stages they belonged. Van Kaam's <br/> method of phenomenological analysis was used to explore their levels of <br/> practice. Six themes emerged, including &quot;knowing myself&quot; and &quot;what I do&quot;. <br/> Content analysis was used to explore the domains of practice. Domains with <br/> the highest numbers of verbalizations were: diagnostic and monitoring, <br/> organizational and work-role competencies, and the helping domain. <br/> Findings for both questions supported those of Benner and affirmed what <br/> psychiatric nurses do in their daily practice. Being patient centered <br/> emerged for both questions. Nursing implications include planning unit <br/> staffing with a mix of RN's who practice from novice to expert. The <br/> presentation will also offer insights into daily practice, such as &quot;always <br/> watching one another&quot; for fostering learning and using the &quot;sixth sense&quot;<br/> to manage the unit environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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