2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161156
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived Emotional Support among Urban Adolescents with Asthma
Abstract:
Perceived Emotional Support among Urban Adolescents with Asthma
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gibson-Scipio, Wanda, Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A 212 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824-137, USA
Contact Telephone:248 366-7412
Co-Authors:Christine Joseph, Principal Investigator; Ed Peterson, Biostatistician; and Georgia Padonu, Associate Professor
Problem: Urban Adolescents with asthma are at risk for poor psychosocial health due to disease-imposed strained interpersonal relationships. Social Competence theory suggests that interpersonal relationships that include provisions of support such as Perceived Emotional Support [PES] contribute to positive psychological well-being. Purpose: To describe the PES characteristics of urban adolescents with asthma. Methods: Baseline data from a randomized effectiveness trial was analyzed. Results: Adolescents diagnosed with asthma or reporting asthma symptoms in grades 9-11 attending an urban public high school completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Emotional Support. Of the 294 youth, 91% were African American, 47% reported Medicaid enrollment, mean age was 15.3 years, and 37.1% were males. Sources of PES included "Special Person", "Family", or "Friends". A non parametric version of ANOVA for repeated measures, Friedman's test was used to analyze the three subscales for differences. The three possible two-way comparisons were made using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test with a Hochberg's criteria used to judge significance adjusting for multiple testing. On a scale of 1 (low) - 5 (high), teens reported receiving the most PES from a Special Person (mean=4.1), as opposed to Family (mean=3.9); p=0.001 or Friend (mean=4.0), p=0.001. This pattern was repeated for females only. Males differed from females on PES subscales for Special Person (mean=3.86) for males versus (4.27); p=0.003), and Friends (mean=3.75) for males vs. (4.13) for females; p=0.001). Additionally, unlike females, males reported the highest PES from Family (mean=3.93) as opposed to Friends or Special Person; p=0.045. Implications: Source of PES varies by gender. Overall males perceived less emotional support than females. Further analysis is needed to determine if these differences contribute to psychological well-being. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived Emotional Support among Urban Adolescents with Asthmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161156-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived Emotional Support among Urban Adolescents with Asthma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gibson-Scipio, Wanda, Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A 212 Life Sciences, East Lansing, MI, 48824-137, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248 366-7412</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sscipio289849mi@comcast.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Joseph, Principal Investigator; Ed Peterson, Biostatistician; and Georgia Padonu, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Urban Adolescents with asthma are at risk for poor psychosocial health due to disease-imposed strained interpersonal relationships. Social Competence theory suggests that interpersonal relationships that include provisions of support such as Perceived Emotional Support [PES] contribute to positive psychological well-being. Purpose: To describe the PES characteristics of urban adolescents with asthma. Methods: Baseline data from a randomized effectiveness trial was analyzed. Results: Adolescents diagnosed with asthma or reporting asthma symptoms in grades 9-11 attending an urban public high school completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Emotional Support. Of the 294 youth, 91% were African American, 47% reported Medicaid enrollment, mean age was 15.3 years, and 37.1% were males. Sources of PES included &quot;Special Person&quot;, &quot;Family&quot;, or &quot;Friends&quot;. A non parametric version of ANOVA for repeated measures, Friedman's test was used to analyze the three subscales for differences. The three possible two-way comparisons were made using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test with a Hochberg's criteria used to judge significance adjusting for multiple testing. On a scale of 1 (low) - 5 (high), teens reported receiving the most PES from a Special Person (mean=4.1), as opposed to Family (mean=3.9); p=0.001 or Friend (mean=4.0), p=0.001. This pattern was repeated for females only. Males differed from females on PES subscales for Special Person (mean=3.86) for males versus (4.27); p=0.003), and Friends (mean=3.75) for males vs. (4.13) for females; p=0.001). Additionally, unlike females, males reported the highest PES from Family (mean=3.93) as opposed to Friends or Special Person; p=0.045. Implications: Source of PES varies by gender. Overall males perceived less emotional support than females. Further analysis is needed to determine if these differences contribute to psychological well-being. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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