2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiological Correlates of Perceived Racism and Coping Responses in Black Youth
Abstract:
Physiological Correlates of Perceived Racism and Coping Responses in Black Youth
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gochett, Philip
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 695 Williams Mall Rm# 613, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 283-2510
Background: Overall rates of hypertension continue to be disproportionately higher in Blacks than other major ethnic groups in the United States. Research suggests that perceived racism and racism-specific coping responses may be associated with such cardiovascular conditions as hypertension. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of perceived racism and coping responses to blood pressure status (normotensive, high normal, and hypertensive) in Black youth. Methods: As part of a larger investigation, participants completed questionnaires about perceived racism and usual ways of coping with these perceptions. These questionnaires were completed in a group setting. Approximately two weeks after the group interview, four resting blood pressure assessments were taken via an automatic blood pressure monitor. The mean age of the sample was 11.6 years (SD=1.47), and average resting blood pressure levels were within normal limits. Seventy-five percent of the sample was nomotensive; 8% were high-normal; and, 17% were hypertensive. Based on a conceptual model of perceived racism and health (Clark, Anderson, Williams, & Clark, 1999), the research questions for this study were as follows: (1) Is perceived racism related to blood pressure status; and, (2) Are coping responses associated with resting blood pressure status? Results: Logistic analyses indicated that perceived racism was positively associated with the odds of having elevated blood pressure. These analyses also showed that the coping responses of "Taking Action" and "Talking to Someone" were inversely associated with the odds of having elevated blood pressure. Conclusion: These findings highlight the potential importance of exploring the extent to which environmental and psychosocial factors are related to vascular functioning in Black youth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological Correlates of Perceived Racism and Coping Responses in Black Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161157-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physiological Correlates of Perceived Racism and Coping Responses in Black Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gochett, Philip</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 695 Williams Mall Rm# 613, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 283-2510</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">philipjgochett@msn.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Overall rates of hypertension continue to be disproportionately higher in Blacks than other major ethnic groups in the United States. Research suggests that perceived racism and racism-specific coping responses may be associated with such cardiovascular conditions as hypertension. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of perceived racism and coping responses to blood pressure status (normotensive, high normal, and hypertensive) in Black youth. Methods: As part of a larger investigation, participants completed questionnaires about perceived racism and usual ways of coping with these perceptions. These questionnaires were completed in a group setting. Approximately two weeks after the group interview, four resting blood pressure assessments were taken via an automatic blood pressure monitor. The mean age of the sample was 11.6 years (SD=1.47), and average resting blood pressure levels were within normal limits. Seventy-five percent of the sample was nomotensive; 8% were high-normal; and, 17% were hypertensive. Based on a conceptual model of perceived racism and health (Clark, Anderson, Williams, &amp; Clark, 1999), the research questions for this study were as follows: (1) Is perceived racism related to blood pressure status; and, (2) Are coping responses associated with resting blood pressure status? Results: Logistic analyses indicated that perceived racism was positively associated with the odds of having elevated blood pressure. These analyses also showed that the coping responses of &quot;Taking Action&quot; and &quot;Talking to Someone&quot; were inversely associated with the odds of having elevated blood pressure. Conclusion: These findings highlight the potential importance of exploring the extent to which environmental and psychosocial factors are related to vascular functioning in Black youth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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