2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161161
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Combined Textual Analytic Methods in a Study of Women Child Abuse Survivors
Abstract:
Combined Textual Analytic Methods in a Study of Women Child Abuse Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hall, Joanne, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA
Contact Telephone:(865) 974-5769
Co-Authors:Jill Powell, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor
A large-scale, 4 year NIH-funded prospective qualitative study of
thriving in women survivors of child abuse is nearing the end of data
analysis (n=44). Its purpose was to explore the conditions, means, and
patterns of achieving success in work and relationships in the wake of
childhood maltreatment (physical, verbal, sexual abuse and neglect). This
study emphasizes positivity rather than pathology, as is congruent with a
feminist theoretical framework. Thriving refers to a multifaceted
phenomena of exceeding "expected" degrees of life achievements and
satisfaction among those having suffered the extreme adversity of
childhood interpersonal violence. The participants were ethnically diverse
with ages ranging from 20s-60s. We elicited narratives in a series of
three interviews from women survivors who have experienced varying degrees
of success/thriving. Analysis was done by an interdisciplinary team. We
believe this research is uniquely innovative in its methods. The study
combines several means of qualitative analysis: narrative analysis and
discourse analysis. Narrative analysis was directed toward holistically
understanding the experiential patterns of "thriving" among survivors of
severe childhood trauma. Narrative analysis in this study was patterned
after Lieblich et al. and Reissman's models. Narrative was considered to
be talk about consequential life events, not only specific "stories."
Including explanatory "talk" as well as content structured as stories is
consistent with womenÆs models of communication. In women's "talk" there
are often multiple foci, or axes around which content is organized. Women
tend to speak about constellations of relationships and multiple roles.
Narrative analysis is especially helpful in illustrating trajectories of
recovery and thriving after trauma, and understanding relational and
self-meanings women construct in reference to these experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCombined Textual Analytic Methods in a Study of Women Child Abuse Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161161-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Combined Textual Analytic Methods in a Study of Women Child Abuse Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Joanne, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(865) 974-5769</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhall7@utk.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jill Powell, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A large-scale, 4 year NIH-funded prospective qualitative study of <br/> thriving in women survivors of child abuse is nearing the end of data <br/> analysis (n=44). Its purpose was to explore the conditions, means, and <br/> patterns of achieving success in work and relationships in the wake of <br/> childhood maltreatment (physical, verbal, sexual abuse and neglect). This <br/> study emphasizes positivity rather than pathology, as is congruent with a <br/> feminist theoretical framework. Thriving refers to a multifaceted <br/> phenomena of exceeding &quot;expected&quot; degrees of life achievements and <br/> satisfaction among those having suffered the extreme adversity of <br/> childhood interpersonal violence. The participants were ethnically diverse <br/> with ages ranging from 20s-60s. We elicited narratives in a series of <br/> three interviews from women survivors who have experienced varying degrees <br/> of success/thriving. Analysis was done by an interdisciplinary team. We <br/> believe this research is uniquely innovative in its methods. The study <br/> combines several means of qualitative analysis: narrative analysis and <br/> discourse analysis. Narrative analysis was directed toward holistically <br/> understanding the experiential patterns of &quot;thriving&quot; among survivors of <br/> severe childhood trauma. Narrative analysis in this study was patterned <br/> after Lieblich et al. and Reissman's models. Narrative was considered to <br/> be talk about consequential life events, not only specific &quot;stories.&quot; <br/> Including explanatory &quot;talk&quot; as well as content structured as stories is <br/> consistent with women&AElig;s models of communication. In women's &quot;talk&quot; there <br/> are often multiple foci, or axes around which content is organized. Women <br/> tend to speak about constellations of relationships and multiple roles. <br/> Narrative analysis is especially helpful in illustrating trajectories of <br/> recovery and thriving after trauma, and understanding relational and <br/> self-meanings women construct in reference to these experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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