2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161163
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Health Beliefs and Asthma Self-Regulation
Abstract:
Parental Health Beliefs and Asthma Self-Regulation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Harrison, Tondi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6-374, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608-263-9040
Purpose: Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Although effective treatment is available, adherence is low. The Phase Model of Asthma Self-Regulation describes four sequential phases in the process of developing skills in asthma self-regulation. Higher phases are associated with improved adherence. Identifying beliefs about asthma present at each phase provides a framework for developing specific interventions to promote progression to the next phase. Before moving into intervention development, it is first necessary to identify the specific beliefs that are of primary importance in each of the phases of asthma self-regulatory development. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between parental health beliefs about asthma and phase of asthma self-regulation. Methods: For this cross-sectional descriptive study, a convenience sample of 100 parents of three to six year old children diagnosed with asthma will be recruited from pediatric and asthma clinics at a Midwestern medical center and from a community Head Start agency. Parents will be interviewed by telephone using: (1) the Asthma Health Beliefs Interview, (2) the Asthma Self Regulatory Development Interview, and (3) a demographic and illness information survey. Analysis will include descriptive statistics to report demographic, diagnosis, treatment, and education information. Symptom frequency will be used to classify level of illness severity. The number and percentage of parents at each phase of self-regulatory development and percentage of parents holding each of the health beliefs will be reported. The proportion of each belief by phase will be compared using a series of two-sample binomial tests. Conclusions: It is expected that each phase of asthma self-regulation will be associated with a unique set of health beliefs. Implications: The information gained from this study will be used to develop tailored interventions based on knowledge of phase-related parental health beliefs. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Health Beliefs and Asthma Self-Regulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161163-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Health Beliefs and Asthma Self-Regulation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Tondi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 Highland Avenue, K6-374, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-263-9040</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tmharrison@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Although effective treatment is available, adherence is low. The Phase Model of Asthma Self-Regulation describes four sequential phases in the process of developing skills in asthma self-regulation. Higher phases are associated with improved adherence. Identifying beliefs about asthma present at each phase provides a framework for developing specific interventions to promote progression to the next phase. Before moving into intervention development, it is first necessary to identify the specific beliefs that are of primary importance in each of the phases of asthma self-regulatory development. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between parental health beliefs about asthma and phase of asthma self-regulation. Methods: For this cross-sectional descriptive study, a convenience sample of 100 parents of three to six year old children diagnosed with asthma will be recruited from pediatric and asthma clinics at a Midwestern medical center and from a community Head Start agency. Parents will be interviewed by telephone using: (1) the Asthma Health Beliefs Interview, (2) the Asthma Self Regulatory Development Interview, and (3) a demographic and illness information survey. Analysis will include descriptive statistics to report demographic, diagnosis, treatment, and education information. Symptom frequency will be used to classify level of illness severity. The number and percentage of parents at each phase of self-regulatory development and percentage of parents holding each of the health beliefs will be reported. The proportion of each belief by phase will be compared using a series of two-sample binomial tests. Conclusions: It is expected that each phase of asthma self-regulation will be associated with a unique set of health beliefs. Implications: The information gained from this study will be used to develop tailored interventions based on knowledge of phase-related parental health beliefs. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:16:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:16:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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